Hunt, Gather, Parent : What Ancient Cultures Can Teach Us About the Lost Art of Raising Happy, Helpful Little Humans
by Doucleff, Michaeleen, Ph.D.; Trujillo, Ella (ILT)







Prologue1(14)
SECTION 1 WEIRD, WILD WEST
1 The WEIRDest Parents in the World
15(16)
2 Why Do We Parent the Way We Do?
31(18)
SECTION 2 MAYA METHOD
3 The Most Helpful Kids in the World
49(6)
4 How to Teach Kids to Do Chores, Voluntarily
55(21)
5 How to Raise Flexible, Cooperative Kids
76(32)
Team 1 Introduction to TEAM Parenting: A Better Way to Be Together
97(11)
6 Master Motivators: What's Better Than Praise?
108(21)
SECTION 3 INUIT EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
7 Never in Anger
129(13)
8 How to Teach Children to Control Their Anger
142(6)
9 How to Stop Being Angry at Your Child
148(17)
Team 2 Encourage, Never Force
159(6)
10 Introduction to Parenting Tools
165(36)
I Tools for Tantrums
167(13)
II Tools for Everyday Misbehavior
180(21)
11 Tools for Sculpting Behavior: Stories
201(13)
12 Tools for Sculpting Behavior: Dramas
214(17)
SECTION 4 HADZABE HEALTH
13 How Did Our Ancient Ancestors Parent?
231(10)
14 The Most Confident Kids in the World
241(33)
Team 3 Ancient Antidote for Anxiety and Stress
250(24)
15 Ancient Antidote for Depression
274(19)
SECTION 5 WESTERN PARENTING 2.0
Team 4 A New Paradigm for Western Parents
293(6)
16 Sleep
299(8)
Epilogue
307
PRACTICAL SECTIONS
Try It 1 Train Helpfulness
63(26)
Try It 2 Train Cooperation
89(27)
Try It 3 Learn to Motivate Children
116(45)
Try It 4 Learn to Have Less Anger Toward Children
161(34)
Try It 5 Discipline without Words
195(12)
Try It 6 Discipline with Stories
207(15)
Try It 7 Discipline Through Dramas
222(43)
Try It 8 Boost Confidence and Self-Reliance
265(20)
Try It 9 Build Emotional Support for the Family (and Give Yourself a Break)
285(26)
Acknowledgments311(2)
Notes313(16)
Index329


An NPR Science Desk correspondent challenges the misleading child-rearing practices commonly recommended to parents, outlining alternatives grounded in international ancestral traditions that are being used effectively throughout the modern world.





Michaeleen Doucleff is a correspondent for NPR&;s Science Desk. In 2015, she was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Prior to joining NPR, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. She has a doctorate in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master&;s degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis. She lives with her husband and daughter in San Francisco.





Time-tested parenting methods from three Indigenous cultures help a mother tame her wild toddler. Doucleff knew there had to be a better way to parent her child, one that didn't result in Rosy's hitting, screaming, and throwing temper tantrums, where every day wasn't a battle from morning to night. Using the investigative skills she has honed as a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk, she traveled to the Yucatan to live with a Mayan family, the Arctic to spend time with an Inuit family, and Tanzania and the Hadzabe tribe to understand how other cultures raised helpful, independent, disciplined children without unnecessary drama and frustration. Doucleff shares the tips and tricks she learned along the way and includes with each chapter a distilled list of insights that can be quickly referenced when the need arises. For example, she explains how to deescalate a situation by remaining calm and instilling awe and how having a child help with chores at a young age may create more work at first but gives the child the chance to learn and assume responsibilities that help the family. Also, when a child understands the consequences of her actions, she is less likely to misbehave than if she only hears the words no or don't. Of course, the author recommends outdoor time, emphasizes the power of stories to teach lessons, and shows why it's important to let children speak for themselves. Doucleff, who has a doctorate in chemistry, interweaves scientific research and her own trials with Rosy into the information she learned from the Mayans, Inuits, and Hadzabe. The result is an intriguing study that should be useful to parents from any culture, especially those who are at their wits' end with their rambunctious, untamed children. Eye-opening looks at how ancient techniques can benefit modern parents. Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2021 Follett School Solutions