That Summer
by Weiner, Jennifer






While trying to pinpoint the root of her dissatisfaction with her life, Daisy Shoemaker begins receiving misdirected emails meant for another woman and starts living vicariously through her until she discovers that their connection was not completely accidental. 350,000 first printing.





Jennifer Weiner is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of eighteen books, including Good in Bed, That Summer, and an essay collection, Hungry Heart: Adventures in Life, Love, and Writing. A graduate of Princeton University and a frequent contributor to the New York Times Opinion section, Jennifer lives with her family in Philadelphia. Visit her online at JenniferWeiner.com. 





*Starred Review* Daisy Shoemaker spends her life catering to her husband, Hal, 12 years her senior, and their 15-year-old daughter, Beatrice, who just got kicked out of Hal's tony boarding-school alma mater and is overflowing with teenage disdain for her ineffectual mother. Daisy teaches ad hoc cooking lessons, but her life mostly revolves around her family. So when an email mix-up puts her in touch with Diana Starling and the two hit it off, she is thrilled at the prospect of making an actual adult friend. But Diana isn't who she says she is, and she has deliberately thrown herself into Daisy's orbit to attempt to reconcile her past. Spurred on by the #MeToo movement, the characters explore the weight that victims of sexual assault carry, and the damage left in the wake of unchecked privilege. But there is also a warmth to the novel, fueled by the Cape Cod setting and deft characterization. Daisy is a classic Weiner heroine, an underappreciated and unconfident woman who grows wings; Beatrice is endearingly strong-willed; and Diana is heartbreakingly sympathetic. Weiner's storytelling skill is such that she paints an uncompromising, complicated portrait of the insidious dangers of the patriarchy that is also a lot of fun to read.HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Weiner's latest is a summer banger with a ripped-from-the-headlines plot, which is sure to garner lots of attention. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





*Starred Review* Daisy Shoemaker spends her life catering to her husband, Hal, 12 years her senior, and their 15-year-old daughter, Beatrice, who just got kicked out of Hal's tony boarding-school alma mater and is overflowing with teenage disdain for her ineffectual mother. Daisy teaches ad hoc cooking lessons, but her life mostly revolves around her family. So when an email mix-up puts her in touch with Diana Starling and the two hit it off, she is thrilled at the prospect of making an actual adult friend. But Diana isn't who she says she is, and she has deliberately thrown herself into Daisy's orbit to attempt to reconcile her past. Spurred on by the #MeToo movement, the characters explore the weight that victims of sexual assault carry, and the damage left in the wake of unchecked privilege. But there is also a warmth to the novel, fueled by the Cape Cod setting and deft characterization. Daisy is a classic Weiner heroine, an underappreciated and unconfident woman who grows wings; Beatrice is endearingly strong-willed; and Diana is heartbreakingly sympathetic. Weiner's storytelling skill is such that she paints an uncompromising, complicated portrait of the insidious dangers of the patriarchy that is also a lot of fun to read.HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Weiner's latest is a summer banger with a ripped-from-the-headlines plot, which is sure to garner lots of attention. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





Revenge for a long-ago assault takes the form of an elaborate long con. "She is fifteen years old that summer, a thoughtful, book-struck girl...." Weiner's new novel opens with a prologue set during Diana's idyllic summer on Cape Cod, babysitting for a lovely family, hanging out with the other nannies, and meeting a cute boy named Poe who hands her a red Solo cup on what she is certain will be the best night of her life. The reader is not so sure. In the next chapter, we meet an unhappy housewife named Daisy Shoemaker, nee Diana, who receives an invitation to a fancy birthday party in wine country that is meant for a different Diana, one whose email address is one character different than hers. When her reply to that email is answered immediately by the other Diana, rather than the party giver, she doesn't suspect there's some kind of phishing going on. Again, the wily reader is not fooled. But there's a whole lot of book left, and we still don't know exactly what happened in Cape Cod, or which Diana is which, and whatever happened to that ominously named Poe? The strongest character in this book has little to do with the main plotā?"it's Daisy's rebel daughter, Beatrice, who creates some comic relief with her irritated thoughts and dead-mouse taxidermy projects. "Maybe I'm dead and this is hell: my mom quoting John Mayer songs and talking about orgasms." Fans will enjoy references to the murder plot of Weiner's previous novel, Big Summer (2020), and sprinklings of Weiner's signature descriptions of food and cooking. But the stereotyped characters, the contrived morality-tale plot, and the amount of preaching are not worthy of this author. Socialist realism for the #MeToo era. Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





Revenge for a long-ago assault takes the form of an elaborate long con. "She is fifteen years old that summer, a thoughtful, book-struck girl...." Weiner's new novel opens with a prologue set during Diana's idyllic summer on Cape Cod, babysitting for a lovely family, hanging out with the other nannies, and meeting a cute boy named Poe who hands her a red Solo cup on what she is certain will be the best night of her life. The reader is not so sure. In the next chapter, we meet an unhappy housewife named Daisy Shoemaker, nee Diana, who receives an invitation to a fancy birthday party in wine country that is meant for a different Diana, one whose email address is one character different than hers. When her reply to that email is answered immediately by the other Diana, rather than the party giver, she doesn't suspect there's some kind of phishing going on. Again, the wily reader is not fooled. But there's a whole lot of book left, and we still don't know exactly what happened in Cape Cod, or which Diana is which, and whatever happened to that ominously named Poe? The strongest character in this book has little to do with the main plotā?"it's Daisy's rebel daughter, Beatrice, who creates some comic relief with her irritated thoughts and dead-mouse taxidermy projects. "Maybe I'm dead and this is hell: my mom quoting John Mayer songs and talking about orgasms." Fans will enjoy references to the murder plot of Weiner's previous novel, Big Summer (2020), and sprinklings of Weiner's signature descriptions of food and cooking. But the stereotyped characters, the contrived morality-tale plot, and the amount of preaching are not worthy of this author. Socialist realism for the #MeToo era. Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2021 Follett School Solutions