What the Road Said
by Wade, Cleo; De Moyencourt, Lucie (ILT)






A picture book debut by the best-selling author of Heart Talk shares comforting verses about the questions we ask ourselves while on life's journey, sharing reassurance about making mistakes, feeling afraid and finding the courage to keep going. 75,000 first printing. Illustrations.





Cleo Wade is a friend, community builder, and the author of the bestselling books, Heart Talk: Poetic Wisdom for a Better Life, Where to Begin: A small book your power to create big change, and Heart Talk: The Journal, 52 weeks of self-love, self-care, and self-discovery. She has been called the poet of her generation by Time Magazine and one of the 100 most creative people in business by Fast Company. Cleo sits on the board of The Lower East Side Girls Club, the National Black Theatre in Harlem, the Women's Prison Association. When Cleo is not at home in California with her partner, Simon Kinberg, and their daughter, Memphis, she can be found traveling around the country on her sold-out book tours, which have become a safe space to laugh, cry, hug, and offer support to fellow readers.

Lucie de Moyencourt was born in Paris and grew up in South Africa, where she works as an architect, set designer, illustrator and painter. What the Road Said is her first book.





From an artist, poet, and Instagram celebrity, a pep talk for all who question where a new road might lead. Opening by asking readers, "Have you ever wanted to go in a different direction," the unnamed narrator describes having such a feeling and then witnessing the appearance of a new road "almost as if it were magic." "Where do you lead?" the narrator asks. The Road's twice-iterated response-"Be a leader and find out"-bookends a dialogue in which a traveler's anxieties are answered by platitudes. "What if I fall?" worries the narrator in a stylized, faux hand-lettered type Wade's Instagram followers will recognize. The Road's dialogue and the narration are set in a chunky, sans-serif type with no quotation marks, so the one flows into the other confusingly. "Everyone falls at some point, said the Road. / But I will always be there when you land." Narrator: "What if the world around us is filled with hate?" Road: "Lead it to love." Narrator: "What if I feel stuck?" Road: "Keep going." De Moyencourt illustrates this colloquy with luminous scenes of a small, brown-skinned child, face turned away from viewers so all they see is a mop of blond curls. The child steps into an urban mural, walks along a winding country road through broad rural landscapes and scary woods, climbs a rugged metaphorical mountain, then comes to stand at last, Little Princeā?"like, on a tiny blue and green planet. Wade's closing claim that her message isn't meant just for children is likely superfluous...in fact, forget the just. Inspiration, shrink wrapped. (Picture book. 6-8, adult) Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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