Field Trip to the Ocean Deep
by Hare, John






Come join the fun as students take a submarine bus on a field trip to explore the ocean deep, in this wordless picture book from the creator of Field Trip to the Moon!

Students dressed in deep sea helmets travel to the ocean deep in a yellow school-bus submarine. When they get there, they frolic with fish, chase luminescent squid, and discover an old shipwreck.

But when it's time to return to the submarine bus, one student lingers to take a photo of a treasure chest and falls into a deep ravine. Luckily, the child makes an unexpected friend- a maybe-not-so-extinct sea creature called a Pleiosaur- that's happy to entertain the young explorer until the teacher returns.

In his follow-up to Field Trip to the Moon, John Hare's rich, atmospheric art in this wordless picture book invites all children to imagine themselves in the story- a tale full of mysteries, surprises, and adorable aquatic friends.

A Junior Library Guild Selection





John Hare is a freelance illustrator and graphic designer. Field Trip to the Moon was his first picture book for children. He lives in Gladstone, Missouri, with his wife and two children.





The ocean's depths offer extra wonders to a child who is briefly left behind on a class trip. In the wake of their Field Trip to the Moon (2019), a racially diverse group of students boards a submarine (yellow, but not that one) for a wordless journey to the ocean's bottom. Donning pressure suits, the children follow their teacher past a swarm of bioluminescent squid, cluster around a black smoker, and pause at an old shipwreck before plodding back. One student, though, is too absorbed in taking pictures to catch the signal to depart and is soon alone amid ancient ruins—where a big, striped, friendly, finny creature who is more than willing to exchange selfies joins the child, but it hides away when the sub-bus swoops back into sight to pick up its stray. Though The Magic School Bus on the Ocean Floor (1994) carries a considerably richer informational load, in his easy-to-follow sequential panels Hare does accurately depict a spare assortment of benthic life and features, and he caps the outing with a labeled gallery of the errant student's photos (including "At lantis?" and "Pliosaur?"). The child is revealed at the end to be Black. Hare also adds cutaway views at the end of a diving suit and the sub. (This book was reviewed digitally with 10-by-19-inch double-page spreads viewed at 40% of actual size.) A quick but adventuresome paddle into a mysterious realm. (Picture book. 6-8) Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2021 Follett School Solutions