Guncle
by Rowley, Steven






"From the bestselling author of Lily and the Octopus and The Editor comes a warm and deeply funny novel about a once-famous gay sitcom star whose unexpected family tragedy leaves him with his niece and nephew for the summer"-





Steven Rowley is the author of The Editor and the national bestseller Lily and the Octopus, which has been translated into nineteen languages. He has worked as a freelance writer, newspaper columnist, and screenwriter. Originally from Portland, Maine, Rowley is a graduate of Emerson College. He lives in Palm Springs, CA.





No longer the star of a hit TV series, Patrick O'Hara could not have imagined that his next leading role would be as caretaker of his brother's young children, but when Greg checks into rehab following the death of his wife, Sara, there seems no one better suited to help Maisie and Grant process the loss of their mother than the man who had been her closest friend. Culture shock doesn't begin to address the adjustments the kids must make when they spend the summer away from their Connecticut neighborhood and in Patrick's opulent Palm Springs home. And Maisie and Grant aren't the only ones facing changes. As a single gay man, Patrick had no parenting experience. What he does know, however, is how to give the children room to explore their feelings and offer sage advice as he becomes their dear ol' GUP (Gay Uncle Patrick). Its somewhat dire premise notwithstanding, Rowley's (The Editor, 2019) sensitive and witty exploration of grief and healing soothes with a delectable lightness and cunning charm. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





A Hollywood star banishes himself to Palm Springs only to be thrust back into the limelight by, of all people, his young "niblings," or niece and nephew. The children, Grant and Maisie, are 6 and 9, respectively, spending the summer with their Uncle Patrick, or GUP as they call him: Gay Uncle Patrick. One of the stars of the beloved TV sitcom The People Upstairs (think Friends), Patrick has for four years marooned himself in the desert, tetchy about his fame, his career, and his unresolved grief over the loss of his partner, Joe, the victim of a drunk driver. "He was so afraid people wouldn‚??t laugh if everyone knew how twisted he looked on the inside," Rowley writes about Patrick. Self-critical but charming, suave yet insecure, Patrick is a memorable character, and it‚??s genuinely thrilling to read screenwriter-turned-novelist Rowley‚??s take on the mechanics of stardom, especially about a star who‚??s no longer young. Grant and Maisie are in Palm Springs because their mother has recently died and their father, Patrick‚??s brother, is near Palm Springs rehabbing from a drug addiction; Patrick becomes the niblings‚?? de-facto parent and therapist for the summer. The tension between Patrick and the kids initially manifests because their uncle doesn‚??t follow the same routines as their parents did, but it becomes clear that the maladjustment stems from a deeper wellspring of emotional turmoil. Patrick, meanwhile, hides his vulnerability and grief behind an armor of wit. He must learn to reveal his feelings and rejoin the world, and the children will help him do so. Although some of the plot is predictable (for example, the relationship between Patrick and young actor Emory), there‚??s true insight here into the psychology of gay men, Hollywood, and parenting. A novel with some real depth beneath all its witty froth. Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





A Hollywood star banishes himself to Palm Springs only to be thrust back into the limelight by, of all people, his young "niblings," or niece and nephew. The children, Grant and Maisie, are 6 and 9, respectively, spending the summer with their Uncle Patrick, or GUP as they call him: Gay Uncle Patrick. One of the stars of the beloved TV sitcom The People Upstairs (think Friends), Patrick has for four years marooned himself in the desert, tetchy about his fame, his career, and his unresolved grief over the loss of his partner, Joe, the victim of a drunk driver. "He was so afraid people wouldn‚??t laugh if everyone knew how twisted he looked on the inside," Rowley writes about Patrick. Self-critical but charming, suave yet insecure, Patrick is a memorable character, and it‚??s genuinely thrilling to read screenwriter-turned-novelist Rowley‚??s take on the mechanics of stardom, especially about a star who‚??s no longer young. Grant and Maisie are in Palm Springs because their mother has recently died and their father, Patrick‚??s brother, is near Palm Springs rehabbing from a drug addiction; Patrick becomes the niblings‚?? de-facto parent and therapist for the summer. The tension between Patrick and the kids initially manifests because their uncle doesn‚??t follow the same routines as their parents did, but it becomes clear that the maladjustment stems from a deeper wellspring of emotional turmoil. Patrick, meanwhile, hides his vulnerability and grief behind an armor of wit. He must learn to reveal his feelings and rejoin the world, and the children will help him do so. Although some of the plot is predictable (for example, the relationship between Patrick and young actor Emory), there‚??s true insight here into the psychology of gay men, Hollywood, and parenting. A novel with some real depth beneath all its witty froth. Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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