Tiger Girl and the Candy Kid : America's Original Gangster Couple
by Stout, Glenn







Prologue: Particular People1(8)
1 Till Death
9(17)
2 A very accurate prediction
26(13)
3 Easy Meat
39(12)
4 Unusual Sacrifices
51(11)
5 Tiger Girl
62(28)
6 Before Heaven
90(9)
7 A Movie Thriller
99(24)
8 A Great Many Good Times
123(15)
9 The Usual Route
138(11)
10 King of This Empty Domain
149(17)
11 In a Rakish Way
166(12)
12 Candy Kid Dares Chair for Love
178(17)
13 Not Gonna Burn Alone
195(19)
14 The Tunnel of Tears
214(24)
15 Beware the Verdict
238(21)
16 A Moral Lesson
259(14)
17 A Gaudy Show
273(14)
Epilogue: Tribute of Sorrow287(14)
Acknowledgments301(2)
Author's Note303(3)
Notes306(45)
Selected Bibliography351(2)
Index353


"A thrilling Jazz Age chronicle of America's first gangster couple, Margaret and Richard Whittemore"-





GLENN STOUT is the author of Young Woman and the Sea and Fenway 1912, and has served as series editor of The Best American Sports Writing since its inception. He lives in Vermont.





Veteran journalist Stout moves away from his usual sports beat (The Selling of the Babe, 2016), among many other titles) to tell the tale of Richard Whittemore and Margaret Messler, Jazz Age crooks, bank robbers, and murderers-the flapper and her man. A decade before Bonnie and Clyde, the Whittemores, who married in 1921 after they experienced working-class Baltimore childhoods, were yearning for bigger lives. They found those lives, at least for a while, leading a gang of jewelry thieves who stole millions before being apprehended and becoming tabloid heroes to readers who embraced the media-created saga of star-crossed romance. Stout brings the Whittemores and their era to vivid life in this engrossing biography. Based primarily on contemporaneous newspaper reports (the Whittemores have barely been touched on in books), the story is romantic and violent, exhilarating and tragic. Stout has clearly done a ton of research on the period, and he's really captured the unique combination of prosperity and desperation that was the Roaring Twenties. The Whittemores finally take their place in the pantheon of early-twentieth-century criminals. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





Veteran journalist Stout moves away from his usual sports beat (The Selling of the Babe, 2016), among many other titles) to tell the tale of Richard Whittemore and Margaret Messler, Jazz Age crooks, bank robbers, and murderers-the flapper and her man. A decade before Bonnie and Clyde, the Whittemores, who married in 1921 after they experienced working-class Baltimore childhoods, were yearning for bigger lives. They found those lives, at least for a while, leading a gang of jewelry thieves who stole millions before being apprehended and becoming tabloid heroes to readers who embraced the media-created saga of star-crossed romance. Stout brings the Whittemores and their era to vivid life in this engrossing biography. Based primarily on contemporaneous newspaper reports (the Whittemores have barely been touched on in books), the story is romantic and violent, exhilarating and tragic. Stout has clearly done a ton of research on the period, and he's really captured the unique combination of prosperity and desperation that was the Roaring Twenties. The Whittemores finally take their place in the pantheon of early-twentieth-century criminals. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





Rip-roaring account of the Jazz Age's most-feared gangster couple. Before infamous criminal lovebirds Bonnie and Clyde, there were Richard "Candy Kid" and Margaret ("Tiger Girl" Whittemore, whose big-city jewel heists and bank robberies made the Barrow Gang's stickups look like candy snatching in comparison. In his latest, journalist and sportswriter Stout raises his game a notch, transitioning from quaint sports history books to this true-crime barn burner, set against the backdrop of a post‚?"World War I America rolling in wealth and prosperity. "Bank vaults were full and brimming over," writes the author, "and all the businesses that catered to this newfound wealth‚?"the jewelers and furriers and night clubs and jazz joints and new car lots‚?"were raking it in by the fistful." Both brought up in Baltimore with virtually no economic prospects, Richard and Margaret married young and faced uncertain futures, with Richard engaging in petty thefts that saw him in and out of prison with not much to show for it. However, it wasn't long before he began making powerful contacts in the criminal underworld and attempting more formidable crime sprees‚?"with his wife by his side. The couple moved from Baltimore to more cosmopolitan climes like Philadelphia and New York, working within a criminal syndicate robbing banks or staging jewelry heists. As they found further success in the criminal game, they enjoyed a glamorous lifestyle of all-night parties, luxury apartments, and fast cars. However, Richard's inevitable downfall came at the age of 25, when an informant turned him in. Stout's fast-paced prose has a Mickey Spillane‚?"like cadence to it that fits his subject matter perfectly. The narrative is unrelenting to the bitter end, when Richard had to confront the kind of forced early retirement that guys in his profession almost invariably faced. A compulsively readable criminal biography as well as a vivid cultural snapshot of early Prohibition-era America. Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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