Vanishing Point
by Brundage, Elizabeth






When his rival, Rye, a famous celebrity photographer, goes missing, presumed dead, after reconnecting with the woman they both loved, Julian reenters a world he thought he left behind, forcing him to question not only Rye's death, but the very foundations of his life.





Elizabeth Brundage is the author of four previous novels, including All Things Cease to Appear, which was a WSJ best mystery of 2016, and was the basis for the Netflix film Things Heard and Seen. She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers&; Workshop where she received a James Michener Award, and attended the American Film Institute in Los Angeles. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times Book Review, Witness, New Letters, Greensboro Review and elsewhere. She has taught at several colleges and universities and lives with her family in Albany, New York.





*Starred Review* It gives nothing away to acknowledge that the famous photographer Rye Adler is presumed dead, though his body hasn't been found, since the book opens with that startling news as read in the paper by Julian Ladd, who had once been Adler's fellow student at the famous Brodsky Workshop, where they had been in love with the same young woman, Magda, a fellow student. Julian is obsessively jealous of Rye's genius but succeeds in marrying Magda when Rye marries Simone, a poet and translator, instead. Time passes, and Magda and Julian's son, Theo, worried about the deteriorating condition of the world, becomes a heroin addict, dropping out of college and living on the streets. The novel moves smoothly between the points of view of the five principal characters as it shifts between past and present. An ambitious, literary novel, The Vanishing Point is distinguished by its characterizations, its pervasive air of melancholy, and its beautiful style ("The sun steeps like tea in the copper dusk"). Not surprisingly, there is a great deal of thought-provoking attention given to the meaning and aesthetics of photography, and, like great photography, the novel is ultimately a work of memorable art. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





The interwoven lives of artists, failed and successful. Rye Adler evokes the late celebrity photographer Peter Beard in many ways: He seems to move easily in the world, gifted and carefree, and everyone recognizes him as a genius behind the lens. Yet something is not right in the now middle-aged man‚??s life, for when Brundage‚??s latest novel opens, a headline blares, "Rye Adler, Photographer of the Rich and Infamous, Is Presumed Dead at 52." The focus shifts to Julian Ladd, classmate and roommate and rival, who early on realized that compared to Rye in most aspects, he was second-tier at most: "Editors would stare at his pictures, glumly, and say nothing." So it was that Julian went into advertising, taking with him the one treasure that Rye could not have‚?"Magda, a strikingly beautiful fellow photography student‚?"and building a life of wealth and conspicuous consumption, all Armani suits and "shiny, expensive loafers." Does it buy him happiness? Of course not. Rye is in turn married to a brittle, brilliant translator whose "favorite language is silence," and each day is a negotiation in frustration. Things soon change from miserable to catastrophic when, the story shifting into the near past, Rye and Magda meet by chance‚?"or is it?‚?"and revelations begin to spill out. Brundage‚??s characters are convincing, if mostly of the sort you‚??d meet in the Hamptons or at tony Chelsea galleries; at its best and most emotionally fraught moments, her novel could be bookended by Christopher Bollen‚??s Orient and Andre Aciman‚??s Eight White Nights. The resolution, however, seems a bit pat, as does the complication that sends Rye‚??s life into free fall. One thing‚??s for sure, though: Readers will root for him over the willfully unfulfilled Julian, whose life consists of omitting "essential clues" and leaving it to others to "draw their own conclusions, which were almost always more complex and intriguing than any he‚??d intended." An elevated soap opera but a well-written and affecting one. Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





The interwoven lives of artists, failed and successful. Rye Adler evokes the late celebrity photographer Peter Beard in many ways: He seems to move easily in the world, gifted and carefree, and everyone recognizes him as a genius behind the lens. Yet something is not right in the now middle-aged man‚??s life, for when Brundage‚??s latest novel opens, a headline blares, "Rye Adler, Photographer of the Rich and Infamous, Is Presumed Dead at 52." The focus shifts to Julian Ladd, classmate and roommate and rival, who early on realized that compared to Rye in most aspects, he was second-tier at most: "Editors would stare at his pictures, glumly, and say nothing." So it was that Julian went into advertising, taking with him the one treasure that Rye could not have‚?"Magda, a strikingly beautiful fellow photography student‚?"and building a life of wealth and conspicuous consumption, all Armani suits and "shiny, expensive loafers." Does it buy him happiness? Of course not. Rye is in turn married to a brittle, brilliant translator whose "favorite language is silence," and each day is a negotiation in frustration. Things soon change from miserable to catastrophic when, the story shifting into the near past, Rye and Magda meet by chance‚?"or is it?‚?"and revelations begin to spill out. Brundage‚??s characters are convincing, if mostly of the sort you‚??d meet in the Hamptons or at tony Chelsea galleries; at its best and most emotionally fraught moments, her novel could be bookended by Christopher Bollen‚??s Orient and Andre Aciman‚??s Eight White Nights. The resolution, however, seems a bit pat, as does the complication that sends Rye‚??s life into free fall. One thing‚??s for sure, though: Readers will root for him over the willfully unfulfilled Julian, whose life consists of omitting "essential clues" and leaving it to others to "draw their own conclusions, which were almost always more complex and intriguing than any he‚??d intended." An elevated soap opera but a well-written and affecting one. Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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