This Is the Fire : What I Say to My Friends About Racism
by Lemon, Don







Prologue: A Letter to My Nephew3(6)
1 Do I But Dream
9(24)
2 We Didn't Get Here by Accident
33(22)
3 My Lord, What a Mourning When the Stars Begin to Fall
55(24)
4 Seeking Justice in the Land of Law and Order
79(20)
5 Of Movies, Myths, and Monuments
99(26)
6 About the Benjamins
125(28)
7 How Change Happens
153(44)
Appendix197(1)
Read197(2)
Listen199(2)
Watch201(1)
Engage202(1)
Acknowledgments203(4)
Index207


"The host of CNN Tonight with Don Lemon is more popular than ever. As America's only Black prime-time anchor, Lemon and his daily monologues on racism and antiracism, on the failures of the Trump administration and of so many of our leaders, and on America's systemic flaws speak for his millions of fans. Now, in an urgent, deeply personal, riveting plea, he shows us all how deep our problems lie, and what we can do to begin to fix them"-





The host of CNN Tonight with Don Lemon is more popular than ever. As America&;s only Black prime-time anchor, his daily monologues on racism and antiracism, on the failures of the Trump administration and of so many of our leaders, and on America&;s systemic flaws speak for his millions of fans. Lemon was the leading voice on CNN guiding viewers through the death of George Floyd and a summer of nationwide protests and riots. Viewers relied on his nightly coverage to guide them through a global pandemic. Now, in an urgent, deeply personal, riveting plea, he shows us all how deep our problems lie, and what we can do to begin to fix them.





*Starred Review* For CNN host Lemon, as for so many others, George Floyd's murder led him to reflect anew on racial injustice and political inequities, and as has also been true for others, James Baldwin's The Fire Next Time provided profound inspiration. Like Baldwin, Lemon begins his narrative with a letter to his nephew, revealing their family's history, preparing him for society's biases, and promising that he will not stand silent in the face of those wrongs. As a journalist, Lemon is honor bound to examine issues with an objectivity that allows for the gathering of facts and the sorting of truth from lies. But it is as a Black man that Lemon brings a searing power and persuasiveness to his arguments and views. In his eloquence and candor, Lemon is a lyrical and ardent advocate for what is decent, just, and long overdue. His dismay and anguish are laid bare with a fervor that is authentic and hard-won. Lemon's call-to-action is a soaring examination of the causes of racist violence and injustice past and present, and he expresses his commitment to asking tough questions and seeking demanding answers that he hopes will kindle the fire this time to constructively confront racism in all its forms. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





The well-known, forthright news anchor astutely diagnoses our nation's greatest malady. Readers who only know Lemon from his high-profile gig as a CNN anchor will be pleasantly surprised by his abundant prose skills. In his second book, the author not only plays off the title of James Baldwin's classic, The Fire Next Time; he also echoes Baldwin's opening salvo (both open with letters to the respective authors' nephews) and its learned diagnosis of a sick society. Lemon begins with a mournful tone: "Today I heard a dying man call out to his mama, and I wept for the world that will soon belong to you." This evocation of George Floyd compels us to take a long view of not just the tumult of 2020, but also the distinctly American history that brought us here. "Racism is a cancer that has been metastasizing throughout the land ever since Columbus showed up," writes Lemon. "It's persisted because the right people had the luxury of ignoring it. Not anymore. With the election of a blatant White supremacist, the problem became palpable, impossible to ignore. It touches every one of us, because it's a detriment to every aspect of our society." Thankfully, within this dilemma, the author finds a sliver of hope. When a problem is impossible to ignore, it may eventually be solvedā?"at least if large coalitions decide they share enough common interest to make it happen. Lemon strikes a nice balance between the personal and the political, sharing moments of his life with his fiance, Tim, and his family, dealt a severe blow by the death of his sister, Leisa. Throughout, the author demonstrates an impressive ability to loop it all together and make it stick. He puts 2020 in context and gives it the language to sing a quietly outraged song. Long on context and analysis, this is a vital book for these times. Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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