Jo Jo Makoons : The Used-To-Be Best Friend
by Quigley, Dawn; Audibert, Tara (ILT)






Hello/Boozhoo&;meet Jo Jo Makoons! Full of pride, joy, and plenty of humor, this first book in an all-new chapter book series by Dawn Quigley celebrates a spunky young Ojibwe girl who loves who she is.

Jo Jo Makoons Azure is a spirited seven-year-old who moves through the world a little differently than anyone else on her Ojibwe reservation. It always seems like her mom, her kokum (grandma), and her teacher have a lot to learn&;about how good Jo Jo is at cleaning up, what makes a good rhyme, and what it means to be friendly.

Even though Jo Jo loves her #1 best friend Mimi (who is a cat), she&;s worried that she needs to figure out how to make more friends. Because Fern, her best friend at school, may not want to be friends anymore&;

The Heartdrum imprint centers a wide range of intertribal voices, visions, and stories while welcoming all young readers, with an emphasis on the present and future of Indian Country and on the strength of young Native heroes. In partnership with We Need Diverse Books.





This beginning chapter book features spunky first-grader Jo Jo, who lives with her mom, grandmother, and cat, Mimi, on a fictional Ojibwe reservation. Her concerns are mostly about making friends and what she should do (or, more important, not do) in order to be more successful. Jo Jo, whose misunderstandings of the world around her recall those of Amelia Bedelia, also has trouble with her clueless white teacher, who can't see beyond Jo Jo's wrong answers in order to understand the Native perspectives that inform her logic. Ojibwe and Michif words are sprinkled throughout and explained within the story; Audibert's black-and-white illustrations help to break up the text for younger readers. Very few comparable stories for this age group exist; further Jo Jo adventures are promised. Grades 2-4. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





This beginning chapter book features spunky first-grader Jo Jo, who lives with her mom, grandmother, and cat, Mimi, on a fictional Ojibwe reservation. Her concerns are mostly about making friends and what she should do (or, more important, not do) in order to be more successful. Jo Jo, whose misunderstandings of the world around her recall those of Amelia Bedelia, also has trouble with her clueless white teacher, who can't see beyond Jo Jo's wrong answers in order to understand the Native perspectives that inform her logic. Ojibwe and Michif words are sprinkled throughout and explained within the story; Audibert's black-and-white illustrations help to break up the text for younger readers. Very few comparable stories for this age group exist; further Jo Jo adventures are promised. Grades 2-4. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





This silly chapter book features a funny Ojibwe girl protagonist. Set on a fictional reservation known as the Pembina Ojibwe, this story introduces Jo Jo, an intelligent and charismatic first grader who is fretting over two big problems in this series opener. Her first worry concerns her home best friend, Mimi the cat, who she fears may deflate when she gets vaccinated. Her second concern is that her school best friend, Fern, has begun to ignore her at lunchtime. From Jo Jo's difficulties with language arts to her attempts to save Mimi, hijinks emerge. Through it all, cultural information about Jo Jo's Ojibwe way of life is shared in a way that suggests her pride for her people, traditions, and family. Young readers will revel in the humor this chapter book offers: the wordplay, the nicknames, and Jo Jo's irrepressible narrative voice. But it is the friendships at her school, where her teacher is White and her classmates are multicultural, that will linger with readers. Even though it is in a border town, the school Jo Jo attends respects her cultural traditions, and the effect is heartwarming. Quigley (Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe) provides a glossary of Ojibwe and Michif words that enhances the experience. Audibert (of Wolastoqey and French heritage) supplies plentiful grayscale illustrations that depict Jo Jo and her friends with big, pretty eyes and expressive faces. A joyful book about growing up Native in a loving community‚?"not to be missed. (Fiction. 6-10) Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





This silly chapter book features a funny Ojibwe girl protagonist. Set on a fictional reservation known as the Pembina Ojibwe, this story introduces Jo Jo, an intelligent and charismatic first grader who is fretting over two big problems in this series opener. Her first worry concerns her home best friend, Mimi the cat, who she fears may deflate when she gets vaccinated. Her second concern is that her school best friend, Fern, has begun to ignore her at lunchtime. From Jo Jo's difficulties with language arts to her attempts to save Mimi, hijinks emerge. Through it all, cultural information about Jo Jo's Ojibwe way of life is shared in a way that suggests her pride for her people, traditions, and family. Young readers will revel in the humor this chapter book offers: the wordplay, the nicknames, and Jo Jo's irrepressible narrative voice. But it is the friendships at her school, where her teacher is White and her classmates are multicultural, that will linger with readers. Even though it is in a border town, the school Jo Jo attends respects her cultural traditions, and the effect is heartwarming. Quigley (Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe) provides a glossary of Ojibwe and Michif words that enhances the experience. Audibert (of Wolastoqey and French heritage) supplies plentiful grayscale illustrations that depict Jo Jo and her friends with big, pretty eyes and expressive faces. A joyful book about growing up Native in a loving community‚?"not to be missed. (Fiction. 6-10) Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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