Singing Away the Dark
by Woodward, Caroline; Morstad, Julie (ILT)






As a little girl walks to catch the school bus on a dark and windy winter morning, she finds that by singing, the woods aren't as scary, the walk isn't as long and the wind isn't as cold.





In the back of beyond, a girl sets out for the schoolbus stop, a good long cross-country hike away. It's winter. The snow nearly tops her boots; the fog of her breath streams behind her. It's still dark, artfully evoked by the deep inkiness of Morstad's night sky (played off against luminescent birch trunks and dazzled by a pair of red mittens and a yellow lunchbox) and Woodward's verse: "I don't allow myself to stop / to look between the trees, / to peer at shapes that shift and hide / where it's too dark to see." The pictures and text follow her as she wends over hill and hollow, breaking into song to keep the specters at bay and stave off cold. The tingly spookiness of the rural dark is slowly, gently beveled as the story takes on the dawn, as the girl passes a farm getting its day under way in the early hours, the lights of the bus cutting through the remnants of night. Night can be a very alien world, but this beckoning book is like an invitation to come walk there. (Picture book. 4-8)

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