Slant
by Williams, Laura E.






As an adopted child from Korea, thirteen-year-old Lauren is teased at her school in suburban Connecticut because of her Asian features, but when she finally gets the consent from her father to have the eyelid operation she has always wanted, Lauren begins to rethink her motives for making such a drastic change as the big day draws near. Simultaneous.





Derided by some middle-school boys as "Slant," "Chink" and other derisive terms, 13-year-old Lauren, a Korean adopted at birth by Caucasian parents, wants to have eye surgery to make her eyes rounder. Her best friend Julia thinks Lauren should stick up for herself instead. When Lauren s father discovers her plan, he reveals a painful family secret that helps Lauren look at herself and her eyes in a new light. Not all issues are resolved, but Lauren s voice and emotions ring true, realistically capturing the ups and downs of a contemporary young teen s life as well as exploring the dilemma of how to respond to blatant prejudice. Slant will complement Linda Sue Park s Project Mulberry (Clarion, 2005) and Rose Kent s Kimchi & Calamari (Harpercollins, 2007) , two books that also portray middle-school Korean-Americans grappling with cultural identity. Copyright 2008 Booklist Reviews.





Derided by some middle-school boys as "Slant," "Chink," and other derisive terms, 13-year-old Lauren, a Korean adopted at birth by Caucasian parents, wants to have eye surgery to make her eyes rounder. Her best friend, Julia, thinks Lauren should stick up for herself instead. When Lauren s father discovers her plan, he reveals a painful family secret that helps Lauren look at herself and her eyes in a new light. Not all issues are resolved, but Lauren s voice and emotions ring true, realistically capturing the ups and downs of a contemporary young teen s life as well as exploring the dilemma of how to respond to blatant prejudice. Slant will complement Linda Sue Park s Project Mulberry (2005) and Rose Kent s Kimchi & Calamari (2007), two other books that also portray middle-school Korean Americans grappling with cultural identity. Copyright 2009 Booklist Reviews.





Lauren attempts plastic surgery when racial teasing shatters her self-esteem in this introspective novel. While 13-year-old Lauren has a loving father and loyal best friend, she struggles with her identity as a Korean-American adoptee. Lauren is adamant that eyelid surgery and epicanthal fold reduction will enhance her natural beauty; she researches the procedure and secretly saves her earnings. Her grandmother's unexpected visit and support propel Lauren to visit a plastic surgeon. Mysterious circumstances surrounding her adoptive mother's death are conveniently revealed when Lauren's belated birthday gift, a photo album of her deceased mother, provides her with a more comprehensive perspective on her troubled history. Refreshingly, she develops her self-assurance through her own independent maturation, without overwhelming adult influence. Lauren's unfolding progression, heightened through photography classes and tender moments with her younger sister, result in a memorable protagonist. There are no surprises surrounding Lauren's inevitable decision, though her budding self-acceptance is subtly nuanced, adding depth to a contemporary topic with a gentle touch. (Fiction. 10-13) Copyright Kirkus 2008 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.






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