Walk Two Moons
by Creech, Sharon







A Face at the Window
1(3)
The Chickabiddy Starts a Story
4(6)
Bravery
10(7)
That's What I'm Telling You
17(8)
A Damsel in Distress
25(4)
Blackberries
29(7)
Ill-Ah-No-Way
36(5)
The Lunatic
41(5)
The Message
46(7)
Huzza, Huzza
53(6)
Flinching
59(11)
The Marriage Bed
70(10)
Bouncing Birkway
80(4)
The Rhododendron
84(7)
A Snake Has a Snack
91(7)
The Singing Tree
98(4)
In the Course of a Lifetime
102(5)
The Good Man
107(7)
Fish in the Air
114(7)
The Blackberry Kiss
121(8)
Souls
129(2)
Evidence
131(11)
The Badlands
142(10)
Birds of Sadness
152(5)
Cholesterol
157(7)
Sacrifices
164(6)
Pandora's Box
170(7)
The Black Hills
177(4)
The Tide Rises
181(8)
Breaking In
189(9)
The Photograph
198(7)
Chicken and Blackberry Kisses
205(12)
The Visitor
217(5)
Old Faithful
222(4)
The Plan
226(7)
The Visit
233(3)
A Kiss
236(3)
Spit
239(4)
Homecoming
243(8)
The Gifts
251(5)
The Overlook
256(8)
The Bus and the Willow
264(5)
Our Gooseberry
269(5)
Bybanks
274


After her mother leaves home suddenly, thirteen-year-old Sal and her grandparents take a car trip retracing her mother's route and Sal recounts the story of her friend Phoebe, whose mother also left.





~ During the six days it takes Sal's paternal grandparents to drive her west to Idaho in time for her mother's birthday, she tells them about her friend Phoebe-a story that, the 13-year-old comes to realize, in many ways parallels her own: Each girl had a mother who left home without warning. The mystery of Phoebe's more conventional mother's disappearance and its effects on her family and eventual explanation unfold as the journey, with its own offbeat incidents, proceeds; meanwhile, in Sal's intricate narrative, the tragic events surrounding her mother's flight are also gradually revealed. After Sal fell from a tree, her mother carried her back to the house; soon after, she bore a stillborn child. Slowly, the love between Sal's parents, her mother's inconsolable grief, and Sal's life since her departure emerge; last to surface are the painful facts that Sal has been most reluctant to face. Creech, an American who has published novels in Britain, fashions characters with humor and sensitivity, but Sal's poignant story would have been stronger without quite so many remarkable coincidences or such a tidy sum of epiphanies at the end. Still, its revelations make a fine yarn. (Fiction. 10- 14) Copyright 1999 Kirkus Reviews






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