Trickster : Native American Tales: A Graphic Collection
by Dembicki, Matt (EDT)






Collects twenty-one short stories in graphic novel format of tricksters from a variety of Native American traditions.





Matt Dembicki is a cartoonist workin' and livin' in the DMV (District-Maryland-Virginia area). He previously edited and contributed to the Eisner-nominated and Aesop Prize-winning Trickster: Native American Tales: A Graphic Collection. He also served at the helm of District Comics: An Unconventional History of Washington, D.C., a Harvey Award-nominated anthology that was named as one of the best books of 2012 by The Washington Post, and Wild Ocean: Sharks, Whales, Rays, and Other Endangered Sea Creatures. Matt is co-founder of the D.C. Conspiracy, a local comic creators collective that publishes the semi-annual free comics newspaper Magic Bullet. Connect with him on his blog at matt-dembicki.blogspot.com.





*Starred Review* This graphic-format collection of Native American tales featuring an old folk favorite-the trickster-hits an impressive trifecta of achievements. First, it's a wildly successful platform for indie-comic creators and an excellent showcase for their distinctive styles. From David Smith and Jerry Carr's heroic, animation-inspired "Trickster and the Great Chief" to the Looney Toons zaniness of "Rabbit's Chocktaw Tail Tale," by Tim Tingle and Pat Lewis, there's a bit of visual panache here for every taste. Second, this is one of the very infrequent graphic novels to focus on Native American themes and events, a surprising absence that this book-along with Shannon and Dean Hale's Calamity Jack (2010)-remedies with respect and imagination. Lastly, as Native American folklore is so directly tied to the culture's spirituality, this proves the rare graphic novel that handles such issues without specifically attaching them to standard religious practices. With stories that vary in emotional tone, matching the ever-shifting appearance and character of the trickster himself and the lessons he teaches and learns, this collection is an ideal choice for dipping into over and over. A dandy read for those interested in history, folklore, adventure, humor, or the arts, and a unique contribution to the form. Copyright 2010 Booklist Reviews.





Vigorously rendered in striking graphic format, this robust anthology of 21 Native American folktales features a bevy of wily rascals in a veritable smorgasbord of trickster tales. Told in the words of Native American storytellers from many nations, these tales use the trickster to teach moral lessons and explain such natural events as how the rabbit got its puffy tail, why the buzzard has no feathers on its head, why the owl guards burial sites or why geese fly in a V formation. Relying on cunning and craft to survive, outwit and amuse, the tricksters include coyote, raven, rabbit, raccoon, wolf, beaver and dog as well as human tricksters like Moshup, Ishjinki and Waynaboozhoo. Each tale is illustrated by a different artist in strikingly different styles, some comic and some realistic but all surprisingly suited to their stories, while the graphic sequencing provides action and emotional detail only suggested by the storyteller. Packaged in a chunky, square-shaped volume, this unique collection of Native American folklore invites readers to sample and savor each colorful, wily tale. (editor's notes, contributors' bios) (Graphic folklore. 10 & up) Copyright Kirkus 2010 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2020 Follett School Solutions