Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States for Young People
by Dunbar-Ortiz, Roxanne; Mendoza, Jean (ADP); Reese, Debbie (ADP)







A Note to Readersvii
Introduction This Land1(16)
Chapter One Follow the Corn
17(15)
Chapter Two Culture of Conquest
32(15)
Chapter Three Cult of the Covenant
47(15)
Chapter Four Bloody Footprints
62(26)
Chapter Five The Birth of a Nation
88(18)
Chapter Six Jefferson, Jackson, and the Pursuit of Indigenous Homelands
106(16)
Chapter Seven Sea to Shining Sea
122(15)
Chapter Eight Indigenous Lands Become "Indian Country"
137(20)
Chapter Nine The Persistence of Sovereignty
157(19)
Chapter Ten Indigenous Action, Indigenous Rights
176(26)
Conclusion "Water Is Life": Indigenous Resistance in the Twenty-First Century202(27)
For Further Reading229(2)
Some Books we Recommend231(4)
Notes235(7)
Image Credits242(3)
Index245


"Going beyond the story of America as a country "discovered" by a few brave men in the "New World," Indigenous human rights advocate Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz reveals the roles that settler colonialism and policies of American Indian genocide played in forming our national identity. The original academic text is fully adapted by renowned curriculum experts Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, for middle-grade and young adult readers to include discussion topics, archival images, original maps, recommendations for further reading, and other materials to encourage students, teachers, and general readers to think critically about their own place in history"-





Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz has been active in the international Indigenous movement for more than four decades and is known for her lifelong commitment to national and international social justice issues. She lives in San Francisco.

Debbie Reese is an educator and founder of American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL). She is tribally enrolled at Nambe Owingeh, a federally recognized tribe, and grew up on Nambe&;s reservation. She holds a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Illinois.

Jean Mendoza is a curriculum specialist focusing on the representation of Indigenous peoples in children&;s and young adult literature. She holds a PhD in curriculum and instruction and an M.Ed in early childhood education from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.





*Starred Review* This adaptation of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States (2014) should be required reading for all middle and high schoolers-and their teachers. Dunbar-Ortiz's scrutinous accounts of Indigenous histories are well-known among history buffs, and in this revision by Debbie Reese and Jean Mendoza, the same level of detail is maintained while still accommodating a teenage audience. From start to finish, they tell a story of resistance to the strategically brutal removal of Native peoples from sea to shining sea, a result of settler colonial policies. There is much to commend here: the lack of sugar-coating, the debunking of origin stories, the linking between ideology and actions, the well-placed connections among events past and present, the quotes from British colonizers and American presidents that leave no doubt as to their violent intentions. Built-in prompts call upon readers to reflect and think critically about their own prior knowledge. Terms like "settler" and "civilization" are called into question. Text is broken up by maps, photographs, images by Native artists, propaganda, and primary-source texts that provide more evidence of the depth to which the US economy was-and still is-rooted in the destruction of Indigenous lives. The resistance continues, and this book urges all readers to consider their own roles, whether as bystanders or upstanders. Grades 7-12. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.





A young readers' adaptation of the groundbreaking 2014 work, An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States, offering an important corrective to conventional narratives of our nation's history. Questioning the ideologies behind the belief systems that gave birth to America's dominant origin stories, this book not only challenges the standard tale of European explorers "discovering" America, it provides an Indigenous perspective on key events. The book urges students to think critically about private property and extractive industries, land conservation and environmental rights, social activism, the definition of what it means to be "civilized," and the role of the media in shaping perceptions. With an eye to the diversity and number of Indigenous nations in America, the volume untangles the many conquerors and victims of the early colonization era and beyond. From the arrival of the first Europeans through to the 21st century, the work tackles subjects as diverse as the Dakota 38, the Ghost Dance and Wounded Knee, the American Indian Movement's takeover of Alcatraz, and the Dakota Access Pipeline resistance. A deeply felt connection to the Earth's health permeates t he text, along with the strength and resiliency that have kept Indigenous cultures alive. Maps, photographs, informative sidebars, points for discussion, and a recommended book list round out this accessible, engaging, and necessary addition to school libraries and classrooms. An excellent read, dismantling American mythologies and fostering critical reasoning about history and current events. (further reading, recommended titles, notes, image credits, index) (Nonfiction. 12-18) Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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