New David Espinoza
by Aceves, Fred






The author of The Closest I've Come presents a coming-of-age Own Voices story that finds a bullied teen becoming obsessed with bodybuilding to the point that he abuses steroids and develops body-muscle dysmorphia. 30,000 first printing. Simultaneous eBook.





Seventeen-year-old David Espinoza is sick and tired of being too skinny. After getting caught on video on the last day of school as a bully lays him out cold with a slap across the face, David begins to withdraw, deciding to devote himself to bulking up before the start of the next school year. He finds a gym close to home, run by a well-known young bodybuilder, but after a few workouts and not enough gains, he comes to the realization that all the YouTube bodybuilders he's been following might well have bulked up with some extra help: steroids. David's journey to an ideal body is fraught with pitfalls as he alienates his girlfriend and his family, develops muscle dysmorphia, and witnesses some truly horrific side effects of steroid use among his new friends. Aceves (The Closest I've Come, 2017) sometimes focuses more on the problem of steroids than David as a character, but the book still stands out through its examination of toxic masculinity, body image, and the dangers of pursuing perfection. Grades 9-12. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.





An intense look at male body dysmorphia from the author of The Closest I've Come (2017). David Espinoza has always been tormented for his skinny physique, but when the high school bully slaps him in the locker room and catches it on camera, the video becomes a viral meme in his Florida town. The Mexican American teen decides to join a gym and build enough muscle over the summer to lay to rest the incessant teasing. There, he meets bodybuilders who influence him to take steroids in order to speed up the results. With graphic detail, Aceves presents the psychological, physical, and emotional effects of muscle dysmorphia. David's relationships fall apart-with his family, friends, girlfriend-and the author, who also experienced this disorder in his youth, authentically delineates the ramifications of this illness, which is more prevalent than many believe. After a shocking climax, David finally comes to grips with his addiction, perhaps a little too quickly, but readers won't mind the not-so-pat resolution. Frank discussions about the sexual lives and dru g use of adolescents add authenticity to the story, and the expletive-laden prose makes this more appropriate for older teens. Toxic masculinity, which is cringingly part and parcel of the testosterone-filled world that Aceves portrays, is threaded through the narrative in a contextualized way. David's friends are mostly Latinx-he has a Puerto Rican girlfriend and a Dominican best friend Searing and thoughtful. (author's note, resources) (Realistic fiction. 14-adult) Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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