Photo By Brady : A Picture Of The Civil War
by Armstrong, Jennifer; Brady, Mathew B.







Collodion
Preparation of the Plate
The Photographer Who Couldn't See and the Man from Scotland
3(6)
The Man from Illinois
9(6)
Exposure
Carte de Visite
15(6)
First Shots
21(4)
Operators in the Field
25(4)
``Yankee Doodle Dandy''
29(6)
All Quiet Along the Potomac
35(6)
To the Gates of Richmond--or Halfway, Anyway
41(10)
Exposed
51(6)
Developing the Image
The Bloodiest Day
57(6)
The Dead of Antietam
63(6)
McClellan's Bodyguard
69(4)
Fredericksburg, Cold as Death
73(6)
The Year of the Turning Point Begins
79(6)
The Wilderness: Part One
85(4)
High Tide
89(8)
Fixing the Image
Gettysburg by Brady
97(4)
Rededication
101(6)
The Man We Have All Been Looking For
107(4)
The Wilderness: Part Two
111(6)
The Image of History
117(4)
Ballots and Bullets
121(4)
And Then . . .?
125(6)
Fixed
131
Notes
Bibliography
Picture Credits
Index


Tells the story of the Civil War photographer, Mathew Brady, and the band of field photographers he hired to travel with the troops and record images of the time.





Gr. 6-9. Readers may need some background to fully appreciate this, but Armstrong doesn't disappoint in a slice of Civil War history that uses photographer Matthew Brady as its touchstone. As the book opens, Brady mortgages his thriving business to fund, train, and equip a stable of photographers to document Union troops in Virginia and the East. The text smoothly juxtaposes the complex decisions Lincoln faced as commander in chief and the devastation at places such as Fredericksburg and Gettysburg against the task of taking photographs in the field. The bloody charges and the daily grind are vividly evoked in both words and carefully selected and labeled photos-some familiar, many unsettling. Intriguing, if unnecessary, text insets ("Photos Not Taken") challenge readers to imagine pictures they might have taken had they been part of the history. Packed with well-documented quotes, this truly absorbing account, written with both honesty and surprising grace, will sear the conflict in memory in the same way the photos did-and still do. ((Reviewed March 15, 2005)) Copyright 2005 Booklist Reviews.





Using photographs to document the Civil War was right up Mathew Brady's alley. In the 1840s, he had created a photographic catalogue of America's most distinguished citizens, and his influence became such that Lincoln could say, "Brady and the Cooper Union speech made me president." It was Brady's art that helped Lincoln gain a national reputation before the 1860 election. Now, Brady brought the war-remote and unseen-to the people, and the war, the president, and the photographer will forever be entwined in our imaginations. Just as a photographer frames his subject, Armstrong frames hers, focusing on the war in Virginia and photographers based in New York City and Washington. The narrative is chock full of fascinating details, many drawn from soldiers' diaries and letters, and photographs are liberally sprinkled throughout the volume. Extensive picture credits and a useful bibliography round out a handsome volume sure to be a fixture in Civil War collections. (source notes, index) (Nonfiction. 9-14) Copyright Kirkus 2005 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.






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