Trapped
by Northrop, Michael






A follow-up to Gentlemen finds three boys trapped at school by a record-breaking blizzard that forces them to employ extreme measures to survive and keep their heads, an effort that is complicated by the presence of two attractive fellow shut-ins.





Michael Northrop is the New York Times bestselling author of the middle-grade adventure series TombQuest. He is also the author of On Thin Ice; Trapped, an Indie Next List selection; Plunked, a New York Public Library 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing selection and an NPR Backseat Book Club pick; and other titles. An editor at Sports Illustrated Kids for many years, he now writes full-time from his home in New York City. Learn more at michaelnorthrop.net.





It's a setup just plausible enough to give you chills. A nor'easter, which will ultimately be known as the worst blizzard in U.S. history, sweeps into a rural New England community, trapping seven kids inside their high school for days. Northrop begins with some dark foreshadowing-"Not all of us made it"-which makes the students' gradual realization of their predicament all the more frightening. First the snow piles up past the windows; then the water pipes freeze; then the roof starts making ominous noises. What begins as a sort of life-or-death The Breakfast Club (there's the delinquent, the pretty girl, the athlete, and so on) quickly turns into a battle for survival. The book is too short; in many ways, that's a compliment. Northrop establishes so many juicy conflicts and potential disasters that you long to see them carried out to their full, gruesome potential. Instead, the book ends right when it's hitting its stride-but there's no denying that the pages turn like wildfire. Copyright 2011 Booklist Reviews.





When a nor'easter stalls over New England, the resulting blizzard strands seven teenagers at school for a week. The stage is quickly set for an edge-of-your-seat experience as Scotty, a sophomore varsity hoops player, narrates with a chilling nonchalance even as he makes it clear that at least one person didn't survive. Telling them, "I'll be sort of like your guide through all of this," Scotty lulls readers into an ordinary morning at school, during which his biggest concern is whether the evening's game will be cancelled, then hints at the horrific things to come with images of "black smoke and blue skin." Scotty and his friends Jason and Pete hang out in shop class after early dismissal, sure that Jason's dad will pick them up. Cell phones die, parents don't arrive and the snow keeps rising, leaving the marooned students to fend for themselves. Scotty narrates from a slight remove, lending a deceptively one-dimensional feel to the cast of characters, a Breakfast Club assortment of various stereotypes from jock and goth to bad boy and hot girl. Just as he did in Gentlemen (2009), Northrop gets at the core of human nature through masterful pacing. The characters rise above their seeming limits, as the dawning realization of their worsening situation leads to acts of desperate bravery. Gripping. (Adventure. 12 & up) Copyright Kirkus 2011 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.






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