Inner Life of Animals : Love, Grief, and Compassion: Surprising Observations of a Hidden World
by Wohlleben, Peter; Masson, J. Moussaieff (FRW); Billinghurst, Jane (TRN)







Forewordvii
Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson
Introduction1(4)
1 Selfless Mother Love
5(7)
2 Instinct--A Second-Rate Emotion?
12(6)
3 Loving People
18(9)
4 Anybody Home?
27(10)
5 Pig Smarts
37(6)
6 Gratitude
43(5)
7 Lies and Deception
48(6)
8 Stop, Thief!
54(7)
9 Take Courage!
61(5)
10 Black and White
66(6)
11 Cold Hedgehogs, Warm Honey Bees
72(9)
12 Crowd Intelligence
81(5)
13 Hidden Agendas
86(4)
14 Simple Sums
90(4)
15 Just for Fun
94(3)
16 Desire
97(4)
17 Till Death Do Us Part
101(4)
18 What's in a Name?
105(7)
19 Grief
112(4)
20 Shame and Regret
116(8)
21 Empathy
124(6)
22 Altruism
130(4)
23 Upbringing
134(4)
24 Getting Rid of the Kids
138(3)
25 Once Wild, Forever Wild
141(8)
26 Snipe Mess
149(4)
27 Something Special in the Air
153(5)
28 Comfort
158(5)
29 Weathering the Storm
163(5)
30 Pain
168(3)
31 Fear
171(17)
32 High Society
188(3)
33 Good and Evil
191(7)
34 Hey, Mr. Sandman
198(5)
35 Animal Oracles
203(8)
36 Animals Age, Too
211(6)
37 Alien Worlds
217(7)
38 Artificial Environments
224(6)
39 In the Service of Humanity
230(4)
40 Communication
234(6)
41 Where Is the Soul?
240(4)
Epilogue244(5)
Acknowledgments249(2)
Notes251(12)
Index263


Presents a revelatory exploration of the diverse emotional intelligence of animals as demonstrated in stories about loving pigs, cheating magpies, scheming roosters, and rats who regret bad choices.





Peter Wohlleben is the author of the New York Times bestselling book The Hidden Life of Trees. He is a natural storyteller who writes on ecological themes. He manages a municipally owned, environmentally friendly woodland in Germany. When he is not writing books or caring for his trees, he looks after the family dog and his small collection of farm animals.

Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson is the author of numerous books, including the New York Times bestsellers When Elephants Weep and Dogs Never Lie about Love. He is fascinated by the richness of the emotional world of animals and by what animals can teach us about ourselves.

Jane Billinghurst's career has been in book publishing in the UK, the US, and Canada, as an editor, publisher, writer, and translator. She is the translator of the international bestseller The Hidden Life of Trees by German forester Peter Wohlleben.





Wohlleben (The Hidden Life of Trees, 2016) offers an insightful consideration of the emotional and cognitive lives of animals. He takes a broad view, presenting stories about the behavior of various creatures including pigs, ticks, ravens, and bats. He is careful not to assign human feelings to the animals he writes about, but readers will be hard-pressed not to notice familiar reactions in both the engaging anecdotes and the clear scientific research he shares, and Wohlleben is conscious of this perspective throughout as he writes of animal regret, bravery, and empathy. The narrative is directed firmly at armchair naturalists and curious animal lovers who are intrigued by the possibilities presented by their pets' guilty or happy facial expressions or the chatty, communal behavior of birds flitting through their backyards. Wohlleben is also curious and proves a congenial guide as he strays beyond the familiar realms of dogs, cats, and bunnies. While this doesn't cover all-new territory, it does illuminate a field worthy of endless study, and pet owners especially will find it a winning read Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.





Forester Wohlleben (The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate—Discoveries from a Secret World, 2016) turns his attention to how animals feel.Writing nontechnically but with obvious depth of knowledge, the author invites readers to imagine that animals have many of the same feelings we do. His argument might not pass the most rigorous of scientific challenges, but it makes good sense. "Basically," he writes, "emotions are linked to the unconscious part of the brain. If animals lacked consciousness, all that would mean is that they would be unable to have thoughts." That does not presuppose, however, that animals cannot have emotions, since animals certainly have the same sorts of automatic nervous system responses humans have; in that view, maternal love may be hard-wired in deer or frogs just as much as it is in humans. All vertebrates, argues Wohlleben, share the same hardware, so to speak, for emotions, and he takes this down into other orders, noting, for instance, that fish produce oxytocin, "the hormone that not only brings joy to mothers, but also strengthens the love between partners," and that even single-celled animals can perform complex tasks involving awareness of their surroundings and, therefore, at least a kind of intelligence. And what of the love that an animal might feel for a human? In that instance, the author observes, the driving force may not be anything quite so immutable but instead a more variable quality: the ability to have curiosity about the world. The upshot is that humans need to give animals more credit for feeling—and therefore should not be so quick to eat them, to say nothing of other kinds of maltreatment. Indeed, on reading this gently learned book, readers will pay more attention to animals generally and learn how to be better neighbors to them. Can squirrels be said to be good or bad? For an answer to questions of that sort, this is the book to read. A treat for animal lovers of all stripes. Copyright Kirkus 2017 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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