Shape of Home
by Kheiriyeh, Rashin






"It's Rashin's first day of school in America! Everything is a different shape than what she's used to: from the foods on her breakfast plate to the letters in the books! And the kids' families are from all over! The new teacher asks each child to imagine the shape of home on a map. Rashin knows right away what she'll say: Iran looks like a cat! What will the other kids say? Open this book to join Rashin in discovering the true things that shape a place called home"-





<b>Rashin Kheiriyeh</b> was born in Khorramshahr, Iran. She received a PhD in illustration and an MFA in graphic design from Alzahra University in Tehran. She has published over eighty books in countries around the world and created illustrations for <i>The New York Times</i>. Rashin was named a 2017 Maurice Sendak Fellow and was the winner of the New Horizon Award at the Bologna Book Fair. She is a member of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators and lives in Washington, DC. Visit her online at www.rashinart.com.





*Starred Review* The concept of shapes serves as a unifying theme as Rashin excitedly prepares for her first day of school. She relishes the smiley-face pancakes her mother makes and the honey from a bottle that looks like a bear. As the family walks to school, they see many things along the way that translate into shapes-and memories, for Rashin, connecting her old home with her new one. Although Rashin is no longer wearing a headscarf, it was part of her school uniform in Iran and appears in the illustrations as she recalls funny adventures with her old friends. Once in her new bright, happy classroom, Rashin's teacher asks the students to share bits of their backgrounds and starts the process by telling them that her grandparents came from Benin, a long, skinny country that looks like a flashlight. Juxtaposing colorful maps and flags of each country with a humorously similar shape keeps the tone light. Oil, acrylic, watercolor, pencils, pastels, and collage in exuberant illustrations give each child a unique look and allow for significant details such as differing hair textures. A warm and welcoming story about a group of children who may have come from other places but have found a classroom that is "shaped like a home." Grades K-2. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





*Starred Review* The concept of shapes serves as a unifying theme as Rashin excitedly prepares for her first day of school. She relishes the smiley-face pancakes her mother makes and the honey from a bottle that looks like a bear. As the family walks to school, they see many things along the way that translate into shapes-and memories, for Rashin, connecting her old home with her new one. Although Rashin is no longer wearing a headscarf, it was part of her school uniform in Iran and appears in the illustrations as she recalls funny adventures with her old friends. Once in her new bright, happy classroom, Rashin's teacher asks the students to share bits of their backgrounds and starts the process by telling them that her grandparents came from Benin, a long, skinny country that looks like a flashlight. Juxtaposing colorful maps and flags of each country with a humorously similar shape keeps the tone light. Oil, acrylic, watercolor, pencils, pastels, and collage in exuberant illustrations give each child a unique look and allow for significant details such as differing hair textures. A warm and welcoming story about a group of children who may have come from other places but have found a classroom that is "shaped like a home." Grades K-2. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





Iranian immigrant Rashin is getting ready for her first day of school in the United States. She begins her day with a series of cheerful shapes or memories of shapes that brought her happiness in Iran. For breakfast, her mother makes her a circular pancake shaped like a smiley face for good luck. When she walks to school in the rain, she uses an umbrella that is shaped like a cat, and she passes bicycle and car wheels shaped like circles. She starts to miss the shapes she knew from Iran, like the braided bread from the baker's, the triangular sails of paper boats, and the heart-shaped wreaths her best friend, Azadeh, made from fresh blossoms. At school, the shape theme continues when Rashin's new teacher, Mrs. Martin, tells them she is from Benin, which is shaped like a flashlight. Soon all the children are introducing their home countries and their shapes: Japan is shaped like a seahorse; Italy is shaped like a boot. And, of course, there's Rashin's own country, Iran, which she says is shaped like a cat. By the end of the day, Rashin is feeling a little better about going to school-and about calling America her home. This ebulliently illustrated, frankly told immigration story glows with good cheer and artfully balances homesickness, excitement, and fear. The author's thematic use of shapes is an organic, child-friendly way to drive a plot that is both emotionally layered and fun to read. (This book was reviewed digitally.) A creative, child-centered picture book about finding a new home after immigration. (Picture book. 3-7) Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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