Queen of the World
by Hardman, Robert







Acknowledgementsix
Introduction1(18)
Chapter One On Tour
19(47)
Chapter Two Welcoming the World
66(39)
Chapter Three Setting Sail
105(33)
Chapter Four Head of the Commonwealth
138(43)
Chapter Five The Realms
181(56)
Chapter Six The Special Relationship
237(36)
Chapter Seven Europe
273(34)
Chapter Eight African Queen
307(34)
Chapter Nine The Yacht
341(33)
Chapter Ten Elizabeth, Margaret and Nelson
374(49)
Chapter Eleven Breaking the Ice
423(41)
Chapter Twelve The Prince of Wales
464(43)
Chapter Thirteen The Family
507(27)
Appendix534(13)
Sources and Bibliography547(6)
Picture Permissions553(3)
Index556


The author of Monarchy draws on privileged access to the Royal Family and Royal Household in a portrait of the longtime British monarch that shares insights into her considerable diplomatic and dignitary work in more than 130 countries. (biography & autobiography). (This book was also included in the December 2018 issue of Forecast.)





*Starred Review* Having recently surpassed Queen Victoria as the longest-reigning monarch in British history, the present queen is generally accorded the distinction of being the most recognized figure in the world. To refer to this surprisingly wide-ranging, complete appraisal of Her Majesty and her significant role and function in not only British society but also in the world order as a biography is to employ a label too restrictive and, frankly, off the mark. From the outset, royals expert Hardman, who has exceptional access to Queen Elizabeth II and her family, stresses the uniqueness of the monarch. The queen has made it her goal, in her quiet but steady and determined fashion, to redefine the role of Britain and the monarchy itself in a post-imperial world of equals. Hardman insightfully addresses her royal tours, state visits of foreign leaders to London, her leadership in the evolution of her position as head of the Commonwealth, her participation in the special relationship with the U.S., and the role of the royal yacht, Britannia, in spreading the goodwill of the queen globally. Hardman also contrasts the character and personality of the queen and her son, the Prince of Wales. Throughout, Hardman's analysis is discerning, knowledgeable, and fascinating. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.





A portrait of Queen Elizabeth II (b. 1926) that highlights her many accomplishments.As the longest-reigning monarch in British history, Elizabeth II is currently more beloved than ever. Recent acclaimed dramas such as the 2006 film The Queen and the hit Netflix series The Crown have further sparked our universal fascination, as each work has delved into Elizabeth's more private life and aimed to reveal a woman with complex ambitions and passions. Daily Mail writer Hardman, who has written extensively on the British monarchy (Our Queen, 2011, etc.), approached this book alongside his current TV documentary. While not exactly serving as a companion book to the series, both vehicles assert a similar reverential approach to the material, choosing to elude the more personal dramas that have beset the royal family and focusing instead on the queen's tireless work ethic and long-standing dedication to her role. Hardman examines the broader areas of accomplishment that have been part icularly significant during her reign. "By any measure," writes the author, "her life and reign comprise a vault of experience unrivaled by any world leader. It is one of the reasons that even those who are not royalists by inclination applaud her dedication to duty." Rather than providing a linear account, Hardman looks at particular topics: the queen's diplomatic accomplishments throughout the Commonwealth as well as Africa, Europe, and the U.S; her associations with various leaders, including her line of prime ministers and her close rapport with accomplished statesmen such as Nelson Mandela and the many American presidents who have come into power during her reign. "There can be few people in the USA, let alone the rest of the world, who have lived through the administrations of sixteen presidents—more than one-third of the total," writes Hardman. The book is grounded in lucid historical detail and often highlighted by colorful anecdotes. However, as a full biograp h y, the dense volume, while accessible, lacks an engrossing throughline to maintain lengthy reader engagement. A respectful and thoughtfully documented history of the British monarch but not the definitive biography one might hope for. Copyright Kirkus 2018 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2019 Follett School Solutions