Here We Are : Feminism for the Real World
by Jensen, Kelly (EDT)







Introductionx
Chapter 1 Strting the Journey
1(21)
Forever Feminist
2(5)
Malinda Lo
What Does "Feminism" Mean? A Brief History of the Word, from Its Beginnings All the Way up to the Present
7(5)
Suzannah Weiss
Feminist Songs to Sing Along To
12(1)
Kody Keplinger
Bad Feminist: Take Two
13(4)
Roxane Gay
FAQs about Feminism
17(1)
Privilege
18(4)
Matt Nathanson
Chapter 2 Body and Mind
22(30)
The Monster Book of Questions and Answers
24(6)
Anne Theriault
The Big Blue Ocean and My Big Fat Body
30(3)
Angie Manfredi
Ten Amazing Scientists
33(1)
Anne Theriault
Pretty Enough
34(4)
Alida Nugent
So I Guess This Is Growing Up
38(3)
Liz Prince
I Have Always Eaten the Bread
41(5)
Lily Myers
Bad Hair Day
46(1)
Stasia Burrington
Dragging Myself into Self-Love
47(5)
Constance Augusta Zaber
Chapter 3 Gender, Sex, and Sexuality
52(34)
The Likability Rule
54(5)
Courtney Summers
Broken Body, Worthless Girl, and Other lies I Called the Truth
59(5)
Kayla Whaley
FAQs about Feminism
64(1)
All the Bodies
65(5)
Kale Posey
Do Female Black Lives Matter Too?
70(1)
Amandla Stenberg
Judgments
71(1)
Pomona Lake
An Interview with Laverne Cox: "i Absolutely Consider Myself a Feminist"
72(4)
Tricia Romano
Feminism Is as Feminism Does
76(10)
Mia
Michaela DePrince
Chapter 4 Culture and Pop Culture
86(36)
Somewhere in America
88(4)
Zariya Allen
Choose Your Own Adventure: Why Fandom Is Right for You (Yes, You!)
92(6)
Brenna Clarke Gray
Drawing for Inspiration
98(2)
Michelle Hiraishi
FAQs about Feminism
100(1)
Facets 01 Feminism
101(4)
Wikki Kendall
Opportunity
105(1)
Risa Rodil
Top 10 List of Black Female Friends
106(2)
Brandy Colbert
Don't Cash Crop on My Cornrows
108(3)
Amandla Stenberg
A Conversation about Girls' Stories and Girls' Voices with Laurie Halse Anderson and Courtney Summers
111(11)
Kelly Jensen
Chapter 5 Relationships
12
Girl Lessons
122(5)
Sarah McCarry
The Princess and the Witch
127(7)
Wendy Xu
Corny Won t Kill Your Cred: Rearview Mirror Reflections on Feminism and Romance
134(5)
Siobhan Vivian
Great Girl Friendships in Fiction
139(1)
Sarah McCarry
Faith and the Feminist
140(6)
Kaye Mirza
Bechdel Test
146(1)
In Search of Sisterhood
147(7)
Brandy Colbert
A Feminist Love
154(4)
Jessica Luther
Chapter 6 Confidence and Ambition
158(26)
The "Nice Girl" Feminist
160(7)
Ashley Hope Perez
5 Tips for "Nice Girl" Feminists
167(1)
Ashley Hope Perez
Shrinking Women
168(2)
Lily Myers
Dear Teen Me: It Would Have Changed Everything; It Would Have Changed Nothing
170(3)
Erika T. Wurth
FAQs about Feminism
173(1)
A Thousand Paper Cuts
174(6)
Shveta Thakrar
The Win That Comes from Losing
180(4)
Wendy Davis
Chapter 7 Go Your Own Way
184(35)
Many Stories, Many Roads
186(4)
Daniel Jose Older
That's What She Became
190(1)
Jen Talley
Reading Worthy Women
191(9)
Nova Ren Suma
Six Great Comics by Women, about Women, for Everyone
200(1)
Brenna Clarke Gray
FAQs about Feminism
201(1)
The Choice Is Yours
202(4)
Kody Keplinger
Guide to Being a Teenage Superheroine
206(6)
Allison Peyton Steger
Rebecca Sexton
Don't Peak in High School
212(3)
Mindy Kaling
Owning My Feminism
215(3)
Kelly Jensen
Intersectional Rosie the Riveter
218(1)
Tyler Feder
Acknowledgets219(1)
Further Reading220(2)
Contributor Bios222(5)
Copyrights227


"A scrapbook-style teen guide to understanding what it really means to be a feminist packed with contributions from a diverse range of voices, including celebrities and public figures, and featuring more than forty-four pieces, including an eight-page insert of full-color illustrations"-





*Starred Review* Earnest, conversational, and dauntlessly unapologetic in message, this collection of essays, cartoons, and interviews boldly celebrates and analyzes feminism as it exists today. More important, it reinforces the concept of intersectionality, encouraging a feminism that is open and accepting while continually reminding readers about the ways in which the experience of being a woman can vary widely for women of color, LGBTQ women, and women with disabilities. Some pieces here are reprinted from other texts (Roxanne Gay's "Bad Feminist: Take Two," Mindy Kaling's "Don't Peak in High School"), while others were commissioned exclusively for this publication. Most of the contributors are writers, often of YA novels and popular blogs, but this takes pains to include a wide array of perspectives, including essays by singer-songwriter Matt Nathanson, politician Wendy Davis, and ballet dancer Michaela DePrince and her sister Mia, as well as an interview with transgender actress Laverne Cox. The voices are wildly diverse: men and women, cis and trans, are included (although women, naturally, dominate), and contributors represent a number of different races, religions, and sexual orientations. The scrapbook-style layout makes this fun, and the intimate, informal tone makes it feel like a journal passed between friends. An education unto itself, the message of inclusion and strength is invaluable. Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.





A progressive antidote to the ancient teen health textbooks that mull over the dry basics of teen identity. Jensen here assembles a stellar collection of writings—prose, illustrated pieces, and poetry—that showcase contemporary expressions of feminism: what it is, what it isn't, and what it can be, as defined by each writer. Representing a diverse demographic, contributing authors include Roxane Gay, Anne Thériault, Malinda Lo, Daniel José Older, Ashley Hope Pérez, and Alida Nugent. Prominent authors and performers share space with bloggers and young people, and voices span a range of gender expressions. Characteristic of the quality on offer is a priceless, heartfelt comic by Wendy Xu that explores the bumpy road of a teen romance that ultimately moves her to affirm her Asian identity. The mix of approaches and the brevity of the pieces make this a book that can easily act as a text for any high school class wanting to engage with the topic of femi nism. The collection deconstructs stereotypical notions of feminism, teaching readers that feminism is more than just transcending gender norms. Through the multiplicity of stories, readers learn that feminism is a personal statement that expresses itself differently for each individual. With its thoughtful, scrapbooklike design and variety of socio-economic and cultural perspectives, the book invites young readers to engage in this roundtable discussion. An embarrassment of riches. (Anthology. 12-18) Copyright Kirkus 2016 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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