#notyourprincess : Voices of Native American Women
by Charleyboy, Lisa (EDT); Leatherdale, Mary Beth (EDT)







Foreword9(2)
Shawl of Memory's Embrace
11(1)
Clear Wind Blows Over the Moon (Cree/Innu-Montagnais/Dene/Metis)
The Ties That Bind Us
12(22)
Tear
14(2)
Linda Hogan (Chickasaw)
Blankets of Shame
16(2)
Maria Campbell (Metis)
Two Braids
18(2)
Rosanna Deerchild (Cree)
My Parents' Pain
20(2)
Madelaine McCallum (Cree/Metis)
#LittleSalmonWoman
22(2)
Lianne Charlie (Tage Cho Hudan)
Reclaiming Indigenous Women's Rights
24(2)
Nahanni Fontaine (Anishinaabe)
A Tale Of Two Winonas
26(2)
Winona Linn (Maliseet)
Leaks
28(2)
Leanne Simpson (Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg)
My Grandmother Sophia
30(2)
Saige Mukash (Cree)
In Her Words
32(2)
Winona LaDuke (Anishinaabe/Ojibwe) & Jen VanStrander (Western Band of Cherokee)
It Could Have Been Me
34(22)
Falling
36(2)
Natanya Ann Pulley (Navajo)
I Don't Want To Be Afraid
38(2)
Imajyn Cardinal (Cree/Dene)
She Is Riding
40(2)
Joanne Arnott (Metis)
Onto The Red Road
42(2)
Dana Claxton (Hunkpapa Lakota)
The Things We Taught Our Daughters
44(2)
Helen Knott (Dane Zaa/Cree)
Freedom In The Fog
46(4)
Zoey Roy (Cree/Dene/Metis)
It Could Have Been Me
50(2)
Patty Stonefish (Lakota)
Honor Song
52(2)
Gwen Benaway (Anishinaabe/Metis)
In Her Words
54(2)
Gloria Larocque Campbell Moses (Sturgeon Lake Cree Nation, Northern Alberta) & Nathalie Bertin (Metis)
I Am Not Your Princess
56(24)
A Conversation with a Massage Therapist
58(2)
Francine Cunningham (Cree/Metis)
We Are Not A Costume
60(2)
Jessica Deer (Mohawk)
The Invisible Indians
62(4)
Shelby Lisk (Mohawk)
What's There to Take Back?
66(2)
Tiffany Midge (Hunkpapa Lakota)
Why Not Indians?
68(2)
DeLanna Studi (Cherokee)
Stereotype This
70(2)
Melanie Fey (Dine)
Real NDNZ
72(4)
Pamela J. Peters (Navajo)
I Am The Only American Indian
76(2)
Cecelia Rose LaPointe (Ojibway/Metis)
In Her Words
78(2)
Hazel Hedgecoke (Sioux/Hunkpapa/Wendat/Metis/Cherokee/Creek) & Tanaya Winder (Duckwater Shoshone)
Pathfinders
80(24)
When I Have a Daughter
82(2)
Ntawnis Piapot (Piapot Cree Nation)
Defender of Mother Earth
84(2)
AnnaLee Rain Yellowhammer (Hunkpapa/Standing Rock Sioux)
Digital Smoke Signals
86(2)
Various
Living Their Dreams
88(4)
Shoni Schimmel (Umatilla), September Big Crow (Tsuu T'ina Nation), Ashton Locklear (Lumbee), Brigitte Lacquette (Ojibwe)
Good Medicine
92(2)
Janet Smylie (Cree/Metis)
More Than Meets the Eye
94(2)
Kelly Edzerza-Bapty (Tahltan) and Claire Anderson (Tlingit)
Baby-Girlz-Gotta-Mustang
96(2)
Dana Claxton (Hunkpapa Lakota)
"Dear Past Self"
98(2)
Isabella Fillspipe (Oglala Lakota)
In Her Words
100(2)
Adrianne Chalepah (Kiowa/Apache) & Lee Maracle (Sto:Io Nation)
Little Sister
102(2)
Tasha Spillett (Cree)
Contributors104(4)
Credits108(1)
Acknowledgments109


Native Women demand to be heard in this stunning anthology.





Being an Indigenous woman in modern America is a social position that often comes with a complex sense of self. Charleyboy provides a self-described "love letter to all young indigenous women" that targets pervasive stereotypes and holds up several amazing role models of success and confidence. Along with fellow editor Leatherdale, with whom she also collaborated on Dreaming in Indian (2014), Charleyboy offers a thoughtfully curated collection of poems, visual art, personal memories, and informative articles. Together, they identify commonalities among women of different Indigenous tribes and create a complete picture of the challenges that they face. The book includes examples of an array of occupations and experiences from professional athletes to social reformers and politicians that readers have likely never heard of. The book fills an under-represented niche. It includes retrospection into the shared history of native people along with their respective cultural traditions, but at its core, it is about what the future holds and what the position of Indigenous women in America will be in years to come. Copyright 2017 Booklist Reviews.





A unique cultural anthology of stories gathered from Indigenous women representing nations in the U.S. and Canada. The voices in these stories defy and deconstruct the common stereotype of the Native American woman as docile tribal "princess." The hashtag in the title is an intentional signal to readers that Native American women are a significant presence in the digital age. This book acts as a platform that allows Indigenous women to express their stories through poetry, vibrant and colorful art, personal photos, short stories, and traditional song. This tapestry of voices addresses reclaiming Indigenous rights, overcoming abandonment and abuse, navigating mixed identity, and cultural appropriation; there is also an homage to 13-year-old Anna Lee Rain Yellowhammer, a young Water Protector who gathered more than a quarter-million signatures to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline. Each page offers eye-catching images that represent the wide diversity among Indigenous women. A poi gnant interview with Dr. Janet Smylie (Cree/Métis) reveals both her personal struggle with depression as a teenager and the challenges she faced while attempting to finish medical school. Co-edited by author Charleyboy (Tsilhqot'in) and Leatherdale, this collection was created as a love letter to young Indigenous women. The vital message that it offers is that Indigenous women continue to shatter stereotypes through their personal successes and creative expression. Both testament to the complexity of Indigenous women's identities and ferocious statement that these women fully inhabit the modern world. (Anthology. 12-adult) Copyright Kirkus 2017 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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