Run Away
by Coben, Harlan






After discovering his drug-addicted daughter Paige, who he has not seen in six months, panhandling in Central Park, Simon follows her into a dark and dangerous world he never knew existed that puts his family and his life on the line.





With more than seventy million books in print worldwide, Harlan Coben is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of numerous suspense novels, including Don't Let Go, Home, and Fool Me Once, as well as the multi-award-winning Myron Bolitar series. His books are published in forty-three languages around the globe and have been number one bestsellers in more than a dozen countries. He lives in New Jersey.





Coben, internationally best-selling author and a specialist in the domestic thriller, signals the dilemma facing his financial-analyst hero in the title: his daughter is a runaway, and, to find her, he must confront all the entanglements and perils of a runaway's life. Coben, once again, shows a well-constructed, lucky life blown open by fate. Financial analyst Simon Greene and his wife, a pediatrician, are well-off Manhattanites with three children. The chasm in their lives was caused by their 21-year-old daughter, Paige, being seduced into drugs and a vagrant lifestyle by a man 10 years older. Simon discovers Paige panhandling in Central Park one day, tries to talk with her, punches her slimy boyfriend, and is arrested and charged with assault. This starts the suspense spiral of the book, which only grows more tense when the boyfriend is found murdered, and Simon becomes the chief suspect. Though marred a little by too much description, which slows the narrative, this remains solid Coben, with clever plotting and dead-on character sketches (Simon's feisty lawyer is a hoot). Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.





A Manhattan money manager who once had it all is threatened with losing most of it in Coben's latest greased-lightning domestic thriller. Things haven't been that great for Simon Greene ever since his daughter, Paige, dropped out of college and disappeared. But his world turns much darker the day that, following a tip, he sees her playing guitar in Central Park and tries to talk to her. Paige, clearly strung out on drugs, takes off, and the closest Simon comes to catching her is punching her companion, junkie Aaron Corval, in the face. His attack, captured on the phone videos of passers-by, goes viral, and he's rebuked by millions of strangers. Three months later, Bronx Homicide Detective Isaac Fagbenle turns up in Simon's office asking questions about the murder of Aaron, who vanished instead of sticking around to press charges. Simon and his pediatrician wife, Ingrid, go to visit the crime scene in the hope of picking up Paige's trail, and moments after one of Aaron's scuzz ball neighbors warns them, "Even if you find her, this story won't have a happy ending," bullets fly, sending Ingrid to the hospital in a coma. Meanwhile, Chicago PI Elena Ramirez is hired to find the missing adopted son of wealthy Sebastian Thorpe III, and a mysterious pair named Ash and Dee Dee are executing a laid-off meat packer in Boston and a tattoo artist in suburban New Jersey. Clearly all this mayhem is somehow connected, and readers spoiled by Coben's long history of triple-barreled thrillers (Don't Let Go, 2017, etc.) will be turning the pages with bated breath. But the broadly hinted connection, a Maine religious commune to which Dee Dee professes undying loyalty, is more cartoonish than compelling, and the alternating chapters recounting the investigations of Simon and Elena dilute the suspense instead of intensifying it. By the time the double-twist payoff arrives, fans will be torn between dissatisfaction and relief. In seeking to extend his formidable range, C oben overreaches: the far-flung complications feel forced and schematic rather than nightmarish. Wait till next year. Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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