Boy from the Woods
by Coben, Harlan






A man with a past shrouded in mystery searches desperately for a missing teenage girl whose disappearance is triggering disastrous consequences throughout her community and the world. By the best-selling author of Fool Me Once. 750,000 first printing.





With more than seventy million books in print worldwide, Harlan Coben is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of numerous suspense novels, including Run Away, Don't Let Go, Home, and Fool Me Once, as well as the multi-award-winning Myron Bolitar series. His books are published in forty-three languages around the globe and have been number one bestsellers in more than a dozen countries. His Netflix series include Safe, starring Michael C. Hall, and his adaptation of his novel The Stranger, headlined by Richard Armitage. He lives in New Jersey.





Natty Bumppo of James Fenimore Cooper's Leatherstocking Tales seems to make a comeback in Coben's thirty-second mystery. The hero, Wilde, is a white man, discovered 34 years ago as a child living wild in the New Jersey woods. Wilde's origins are a mystery, but many suspect he was raised by members of the Ramapough Lenape Nation (which is a part of the Delaware Indians who raised Bumppo). Somehow, Wilde emerged, with no memory of how he was raised, but very fit, literate, and wise. Like Bumppo, Wilde has the advantage of knowing how to track and hunt, and his military training ramps these abilities up. A famous criminal attorney and TV commentator reaches out to Wilde when her grandson is upset by the disappearance of a classmate, a girl who has endured years of hard-core bullying. Coben is excellent, as always, at showing the perils of the everyday and the bit-by-bit escalations of cruelty. But the mystery seems hastily constructed, and the ending comes out of nowhere. Not up to Coben's usual level; this Natty Bumppo should return to the forest.HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Even when not in top form, Coben draws a crowd, and this lesser effort is likely to climb best-seller lists. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





Natty Bumppo of James Fenimore Cooper's Leatherstocking Tales seems to make a comeback in Coben's thirty-second mystery. The hero, Wilde, is a white man, discovered 34 years ago as a child living wild in the New Jersey woods. Wilde's origins are a mystery, but many suspect he was raised by members of the Ramapough Lenape Nation (which is a part of the Delaware Indians who raised Bumppo). Somehow, Wilde emerged, with no memory of how he was raised, but very fit, literate, and wise. Like Bumppo, Wilde has the advantage of knowing how to track and hunt, and his military training ramps these abilities up. A famous criminal attorney and TV commentator reaches out to Wilde when her grandson is upset by the disappearance of a classmate, a girl who has endured years of hard-core bullying. Coben is excellent, as always, at showing the perils of the everyday and the bit-by-bit escalations of cruelty. But the mystery seems hastily constructed, and the ending comes out of nowhere. Not up to Coben's usual level; this Natty Bumppo should return to the forest.HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Even when not in top form, Coben draws a crowd, and this lesser effort is likely to climb best-seller lists. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





Coben's latest darkest-suburbs thriller sets a decidedly offbeat detective on the trail of a crime with overtones unmistakably redolent of once and future presidential elections. Wilde is called Wilde because nobody's known his real name from the moment a pair of hikers found him foraging for himself in Ramapo Mountain State Forest 24 years ago. Now over 40, he's had experience as both a lost boy and a private investigator. That makes him an obvious person to help when his godson, Sweet Water High School student Matthew Crimstein, expresses concern to his grandmother, attorney Hester Crimstein, that his bullied classmate Naomi Pine has gone missing. Matthew doesn't really want anyone to help. He doesn't even want anyone to notice his agitation. But Hester, taking the time from her criminal defense of financial consultant Simon Greene (Run Away, 2019) to worm the details out of him, asks Wilde to lend a hand, and sure enough, Wilde, unearthing an unsavory backstory that links Naomi to bullying classmate Crash Maynard, whose TV producer father, Dash Maynard, is close friends with reality TV star-turned-presidential hopeful Rusty Eggers, finds Naomi hale and hearty. Everything's hunky-dory for one week, and then she disappears again. And this time, so does Crash after a brief visit to Matthew in which he tearfully confesses his guilt about the bad stuff he did to Naomi. This second disappearance veers into more obviously criminal territory with the arrival of a ransom note that demands, not money, but the allegedly incriminating videotapes of Rusty Eggers that Dash and Delia Maynard have had squirreled away for 30 years. The tapes link Rusty to a forgotten and forgettable homicide and add a paranoid new ripped-from-the-headlines dimension to the author's formidable range. Readers who can tune out all the subplots will find the kidnappers easy to spot, but Coben finds room for three climactic surprises, one of them a honey. Now that Coben's added politics to his heady brew, expect sex and religion to join the mix. Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





Coben's latest darkest-suburbs thriller sets a decidedly offbeat detective on the trail of a crime with overtones unmistakably redolent of once and future presidential elections. Wilde is called Wilde because nobody's known his real name from the moment a pair of hikers found him foraging for himself in Ramapo Mountain State Forest 24 years ago. Now over 40, he's had experience as both a lost boy and a private investigator. That makes him an obvious person to help when his godson, Sweet Water High School student Matthew Crimstein, expresses concern to his grandmother, attorney Hester Crimstein, that his bullied classmate Naomi Pine has gone missing. Matthew doesn't really want anyone to help. He doesn't even want anyone to notice his agitation. But Hester, taking the time from her criminal defense of financial consultant Simon Greene (Run Away, 2019) to worm the details out of him, asks Wilde to lend a hand, and sure enough, Wilde, unearthing an unsavory backstory that links Naomi to bullying classmate Crash Maynard, whose TV producer father, Dash Maynard, is close friends with reality TV star-turned-presidential hopeful Rusty Eggers, finds Naomi hale and hearty. Everything's hunky-dory for one week, and then she disappears again. And this time, so does Crash after a brief visit to Matthew in which he tearfully confesses his guilt about the bad stuff he did to Naomi. This second disappearance veers into more obviously criminal territory with the arrival of a ransom note that demands, not money, but the allegedly incriminating videotapes of Rusty Eggers that Dash and Delia Maynard have had squirreled away for 30 years. The tapes link Rusty to a forgotten and forgettable homicide and add a paranoid new ripped-from-the-headlines dimension to the author's formidable range. Readers who can tune out all the subplots will find the kidnappers easy to spot, but Coben finds room for three climactic surprises, one of them a honey. Now that Coben's added politics to his heady brew, expect sex and religion to join the mix. Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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