Crooked River
by Preston, Douglas; Child, Lincoln






Investigating dozens of grisly blue shoes containing severed human feet floating in the ocean off the coast of Florida, Pendergast and Junior Agent Coldmoon make harrowing discoveries while confronting an adversary of unimaginable power. 250,000 first printing.





The thrillers of Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child "stand head and shoulders above their rivals" (Publishers Weekly). Preston & Child's Relic and The Cabinet of Curiosities were chosen by readers in a National Public Radio poll as being among the one hundred greatest thrillers ever written, and Relic was made into a number-one box office hit movie. They are coauthors of the famed Pendergast series, and their recent novels include Verses for the Dead, City of Endless Night, The Obsidian Chamber, and Blue Labyrinth. In addition to his novels and nonfiction works (such as The Lost City of the Monkey God), Preston writes about archaeology for the The New Yorker and National Geographics magazines. Lincoln Child is a Florida resident and former book editor who has published seven novels of his own, including such bestsellers as, Full Wolf Moon and Deep Storm.


Readers can sign up for The Pendergast File, a monthly "strangely entertaining" newsletter from the authors, at their website, PrestonChild.com. The authors welcome visitors to their Facebook page, where they post regularly.





Picking up shortly after the events detailed in Verses for the Dead (2018), the new Aloysius Pendergast thriller pits the rebellious FBI agent against the person or persons responsible for the dozens of dismembered feet washing up on a Florida beach. Unfortunately for Pendergast, solving this mystery will require him to do battle with some of his colleagues, law-enforcement people with their own ideas of how to go about catching a killer. Red herrings and dead ends abound in this especially intricately plotted entry in the Pendergast series, which is also noteworthy (as usual) for its finely drawn characters and its writing style, which overlays contemporary storytelling with a lightly ornate flavoring. Pendergast remains a thoroughly engaging maverick, working within the rule-bound FBI but always going his own way, and this fine novel showcases his intelligence, determination, and tolerate-no-idiots investigative style. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





Picking up shortly after the events detailed in Verses for the Dead (2018), the new Aloysius Pendergast thriller pits the rebellious FBI agent against the person or persons responsible for the dozens of dismembered feet washing up on a Florida beach. Unfortunately for Pendergast, solving this mystery will require him to do battle with some of his colleagues, law-enforcement people with their own ideas of how to go about catching a killer. Red herrings and dead ends abound in this especially intricately plotted entry in the Pendergast series, which is also noteworthy (as usual) for its finely drawn characters and its writing style, which overlays contemporary storytelling with a lightly ornate flavoring. Pendergast remains a thoroughly engaging maverick, working within the rule-bound FBI but always going his own way, and this fine novel showcases his intelligence, determination, and tolerate-no-idiots investigative style. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





FBI Special Agent Aloysius Pendergast finds evil afoot in his latest action-filled adventure (Verses for the Dead, 2018, etc.). Imagine Florida beachcombers' shock when they discover a shoe with a severed foot inside. Soon they see dozens more feet, all in identical shoes, bobbing toward the beach. Police and FBI ultimately count more than a hundred of them washing up on Sanibel and Captiva Islands' tranquil shores. Pendergast teams up with the junior Special Agent Armstrong Coldmoon to investigate this strange phenomenon. Oceanographers use a supercomputer to analyze Gulf currents and attempt to determine where the feet entered the ocean. Were they dumped off a ship or an island? Does each one represent a homicide? Analysts examine chemical residues and pollen, even the angle of each foot's amputation, but the puzzle defies all explanation. Attention focuses on Cuba, where "something terrible was happening" in front of a coastal prison, and on China, the apparent source of the shoes. The clever plot is "a most baffling case indeed" for the brilliant Pendergast, but it's the type of problem he thrives on. He's hardly a stereotypical FBI agent, given for example his lemon-colored silk suit, his Panama hat, and his legendary insistence on working alone—until now. Pendergast rarely blinks—perhaps, someone surmises, he's part reptile. But equally odd is Constance Greene, his "extraordinarily beautiful," smart, and sarcastic young "ward" who has "eyes that had seen everything and, as a result, were surprised by nothing." Coldmoon is more down to earth: part Lakota, part Italian, and "every inch a Fed." Add in murderous drug dealers, an intrepid newspaper reporter, coyotes crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, and a pissed-off wannabe graphic novelist, and you have a thoroughly entertaining cast of characters. There is plenty of suspense, and the action gets bloody. Great storytelling, a quirky hero, and a quirkier plot make this a winner for adventure fans. Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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