Slippery Slope of Healthcare : Why Bad Things Happen to Healthy Patients and How to Avoid Them
by Kussin, Steven Z., M.D.







Acknowledgmentsxi
Introduction: The Slope1(16)
1 Your Money or Your Life: Profit, Greed, and the Healthcare Colossus
17(28)
2 Science in Healthcare: The Beast Wears White
45(30)
3 Doctors--Love Them, Hate Them: You Can't Live Without Them (or Can You?)
75(32)
4 YOU!
107(30)
5 Screening: Don't Say No; Just Say Whoa!
137(32)
6 TV vs. MD
169(24)
7 Shared Decision Making
193(26)
Notes219(88)
Index307(12)
About the Author319


A slippery slope describes how events progress from an initially innocent step to a cascade of subsequent misfortunes that are increasingly inevitable, difficult to stop, and more harmful than the last. In the attempt to improve what is already just fine, patients can unknowingly find themselves on this slope. This book shows them how to avoid it.





Steven Kussin, MD, is a physician, author, television commentator, and a pioneer in the Shared Decision movement. He founded and led his clinical practice for three decades. He then wrote, Doctor, Your Patient Will See You Now: Gaining the upper hand in your medical care (Rowman & Littlefield). He founded The Shared Decision Center in Central New York. It was one of the first private independent practices of its type in the country and served consumers across the nation. He retired from his center in 2015.





Beware of the "simple" or "routine" blood test or X-ray; it can lead to a slippery slope of interventions. And pay close attention to updates to guidelines, such as the 2017 change in the definition of hypertension. As Kussin (Doctor, Your Patient Will See You Now, 2011) notes, "30 million of us awoke to a new diagnosis." Overdiagnosis and overtreatment can bring unintended consequences. For example, medications to reduce blood pressure can increase the risks of dizziness and falls. Largely because of high-volume, high-profit procedures like joint replacements and "excessive reliance" on imaging technologies (like CT scans), Americans pay almost double what people in equivalent countries pay. What can consumers do? Kussin advises that patients seek medical information from free, legitimate resources like MedPage Today and Medline Plus. We should also pay attention to which screening tests save lives, and be your own advocate. Before saying yes to what might seem like the latest miracle treatment, Kussin writes, think about "mighty forces" like the stature of doctors before saying "yes" to the latest exam or prescription. Cautionary and empowering. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





Beware of the "simple" or "routine" blood test or X-ray; it can lead to a slippery slope of interventions. And pay close attention to updates to guidelines, such as the 2017 change in the definition of hypertension. As Kussin (Doctor, Your Patient Will See You Now, 2011) notes, "30 million of us awoke to a new diagnosis." Overdiagnosis and overtreatment can bring unintended consequences. For example, medications to reduce blood pressure can increase the risks of dizziness and falls. Largely because of high-volume, high-profit procedures like joint replacements and "excessive reliance" on imaging technologies (like CT scans), Americans pay almost double what people in equivalent countries pay. What can consumers do? Kussin advises that patients seek medical information from free, legitimate resources like MedPage Today and Medline Plus. We should also pay attention to which screening tests save lives, and be your own advocate. Before saying yes to what might seem like the latest miracle treatment, Kussin writes, think about "mighty forces" like the stature of doctors before saying "yes" to the latest exam or prescription. Cautionary and empowering. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.






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