My Best Friend
by Fogliano, Julie; Tamaki, Jillian (ILT)






Two girls quickly become best friends, even before they learn one another's names.





Julie Fogliano is the New York Times bestselling author of And Then It&;s Spring and If You Want to See a Whale as well as the poetry collection When Green Becomes Tomatoes and the picture books If I Was the Sunshine, My Best Friend, and When&;s My Birthday. Recipient of the 2013 the Ezra Jack Keats award, her books have been translated into more than ten languages. Julie lives in the Hudson Valley with her husband and three children. When she is not folding laundry or wondering what to make for dinner, she is staring out the window waiting for a book idea to fly by.

Jillian Tamaki is an illustrator and artist best known for her graphic novels. This One Summer, cocreated with Mariko Tamaki, was awarded a Caldecott Honor, a Printz Honor, and an Eisner Award. She is the author-illustrator of They Say Blue and the illustrator of My Best Friend by Julie Fogliano. Jillian lives in Toronto.





*Starred Review* Fogliano (Just In Case You Want to Fly, 2019) has a knack for capturing the emotional tenor of very specific little kid experiences, and her latest, in collaboration with Tamaki (They Say Blue, 2018), is no different. Two girls, one pale with ginger hair, the other with sleek black hair and glasses, joyously run around a playground, sharing jokes, games, and quiet time, while Fogliano's lines narrate the redhead's inner monologue: "i have a new friend / and her hair is black / and it shines / and it shines / and she always laughs at everything." Their spontaneous, imaginative play lacks logical sequence, but it's clear from Tamaki's exuberant artwork, in a limited palette of warm, peachy pinks and deep, earthy greens, that logic doesn't matter one bit. The girls quack like ducks; one chases the other with a spooky leaf; the redhead pretends to be a pickle-and through it all, they bounce around the page spreads with sheer happiness on their faces. Then their day of fun abruptly comes to an end, when it's revealed that the girls only just met. Tamaki's masterful grasp of faces and mirthful body language, echoed in the looping, lively movement of the plants and animals in the background, is a captivating complement to Fogliano's plainspoken but evocative text, and the combination is sure to resonate with anyone who's ever made a fast friend. Preschool-Grade 1. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





*Starred Review* Fogliano (Just In Case You Want to Fly, 2019) has a knack for capturing the emotional tenor of very specific little kid experiences, and her latest, in collaboration with Tamaki (They Say Blue, 2018), is no different. Two girls, one pale with ginger hair, the other with sleek black hair and glasses, joyously run around a playground, sharing jokes, games, and quiet time, while Fogliano's lines narrate the redhead's inner monologue: "i have a new friend / and her hair is black / and it shines / and it shines / and she always laughs at everything." Their spontaneous, imaginative play lacks logical sequence, but it's clear from Tamaki's exuberant artwork, in a limited palette of warm, peachy pinks and deep, earthy greens, that logic doesn't matter one bit. The girls quack like ducks; one chases the other with a spooky leaf; the redhead pretends to be a pickle-and through it all, they bounce around the page spreads with sheer happiness on their faces. Then their day of fun abruptly comes to an end, when it's revealed that the girls only just met. Tamaki's masterful grasp of faces and mirthful body language, echoed in the looping, lively movement of the plants and animals in the background, is a captivating complement to Fogliano's plainspoken but evocative text, and the combination is sure to resonate with anyone who's ever made a fast friend. Preschool-Grade 1. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





Friendships are always new at first, with moments full of uncertainty and potential. On the opening endpapers, a bold illustration of a young girl with pale skin and red hair gazes at readers, inviting them into a story that, like her friendship, is just beginning. Turn the page and the perspective shifts, as readers become bystanders to a budding interaction with a second girl, also pale-skinned but with black hair and glasses. Simple, spare text that shifts easily from first to second person weaves the tale of this dynamic pair as they leap and swing through each other's imaginations and discover likes and dislikes, complexities, and nuances that make a friendship solid. Their hug, at the emotional climax of the book, is portrayed up close, surrounded by dynamic lines that evoke the energy of the moment and juxtaposed with text that belies an inner uncertainty that can be common with meeting new people. Though they don't yet know each other's names, still these girls are kindred spirits. The closing illustration mirrors the opening one—the protagonist looking away from readers and toward her new buddy as each girl leaves with her caregiver. Tamaki depicts the girls in soft, round lines rendered in red and green colored pencil, which evokes an emotional resonance through the artwork. A delightful new friendship portrayed in all its emergent, ebullient, and transformative ways. (Picture book. 3-7) Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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