Why?
by Rex, Adam; Keane, Claire (ILT)






In a celebration of a child's curious mind, a little girl becomes the only person in a frightened crowd to question supervillain Dr. X-Ray about why he is swooping around and scaring everyone, uncovering the surprising truth about his bullying behaviors. By the creator of Chu's Day. Simultaneous eBook. Illustrations.





Adam Rex is an illustrator and author of books such as Nothing Rhymes with Orange and Chu's Day. He lives in Tucson, Arizona.

Claire Keane is the illustrator of Love Is and is known for her development art for the movies Tangled and Frozen. She lives in Venice Beach, California.





*Starred Review* A supervillain's triumphant debut-bursting through the roof of a mall-is stymied by a little girl who has wandered off from her mother. "No one can withstand the power of Doctor X-Ray!" he cries, only to be countered by an innocent "Why?" So begins an all-too-familiar back-and-forth, with the hilariously earnest doctor supplying thoughtful answers to the girl's carelessly repeated question. Her Socratic method soon breaks through his villainous facade as they sit in the furniture store, him lying on a couch, baring his soul in what has become a therapy session. We learn that, as a child, he wanted to sell yarn-"Knitting is amazing!"-but his father forced him into being a doctor. Now he means to rule the world. "Why?" The doctor collapses to his knees, clinging to the girl's teddy bear. "Because then maybe my daddy will be proud of me!" There's a charming old-school aesthetic at play, from the mall setting and evil-doctor trope to Keane's loose line-and-wash illustrations, reminiscent of mid-twentieth-century cartoonists. While readings may inspire unfortunate imitations from youngsters ("Why? Why? Why?"), Rex delivers a storytime home run-hilarious, heartfelt, instructive, and interactive. Kids will love chiming in with the little girl as she gets to the root of Doctor X-Ray's anger, and in the process, they'll absorb an important lesson about introspection. Preschool-Grade 2. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.





*Starred Review* A supervillain's triumphant debut-bursting through the roof of a mall-is stymied by a little girl who has wandered off from her mother. "No one can withstand the power of Doctor X-Ray!" he cries, only to be countered by an innocent "Why?" So begins an all-too-familiar back-and-forth, with the hilariously earnest doctor supplying thoughtful answers to the girl's carelessly repeated question. Her Socratic method soon breaks through his villainous facade as they sit in the furniture store, him lying on a couch, baring his soul in what has become a therapy session. We learn that, as a child, he wanted to sell yarn-"Knitting is amazing!"-but his father forced him into being a doctor. Now he means to rule the world. "Why?" The doctor collapses to his knees, clinging to the girl's teddy bear. "Because then maybe my daddy will be proud of me!" There's a charming old-school aesthetic at play, from the mall setting and evil-doctor trope to Keane's loose line-and-wash illustrations, reminiscent of mid-twentieth-century cartoonists. While readings may inspire unfortunate imitations from youngsters ("Why? Why? Why?"), Rex delivers a storytime home run-hilarious, heartfelt, instructive, and interactive. Kids will love chiming in with the little girl as she gets to the root of Doctor X-Ray's anger, and in the process, they'll absorb an important lesson about introspection. Preschool-Grade 2. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.





Doctor X-Ray, a megalomaniac with an X-ray blaster and an indestructible battle suit, crashes through the ceiling of the local mall. Innocent patrons scatter to safety. But one curious child gazes directly at the bully and asks: "Why?" At first, Doctor X-Ray answers with all the menace and swagger of a supervillain. The curious child, armed with only a stuffed bear and clad in a bright red dress, is not satisfied with the answers and continues asking: "Why?" As his pale cheeks flush with emotion, Doctor X-Ray peels back the onion of his interior life, unearthing powerful reasons behind his pursuit of tyranny. This all sounds heavy, but the humorously monotonous questions coupled with free-wheeling illustrations by Keane set a quick pace with comical results. At 60 pages, the book has room to follow this thread back to the diabolical bully's childhood. Most of the answers go beyond a child's understanding—parental entertainment between the howl of the monosyllabic chorus. It is the digital artwork, which is reminiscent of Quentin Blake's, that creates a joyful undercurrent of rebellion with bold and l oose brush strokes, patches of color, and expressive faces. The illustrations harken to a previous era save for the thoroughly liberated Asian child speaking truth to power. A funny David-versus-Goliath story with a one-word question serving as the slingshot. (Picture book. 3-5) Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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