Duckling Gets a Cookie!?
by Willems, Mo; Willems, Mo (ILT)






Pigeon is very angry when the duckling gets a cookie just by asking politely.





Mo Willems (www.pigeonpresents.com), a number-one New York Times best-selling author and illustrator, has been awarded three Caldecott Honors, two Theodor Seuss Geisel Medals, and a Geisel Honor. His debut, Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!, was inducted into the Picture Book Hall of Fame in 2009. Other favorites include the award-winning Elephant & Piggie series and Naked Mole Rat Gets Dressed.

Mo began his career on Sesame Street, where he garnered six Emmy Awards. He lives with his family in Massachusetts.





Pigeon is back, in all of his indignant, passive-aggressive glory, overwrought this time at one gross injustice: a cute little duckling is now on the scene and has been rewarded a cookie (with nuts) for doing nothing more than asking for it politely. Pigeon pulls out all of the usual pigeon stops-coy glances, cartwheels, and crocodile tears-in the hopes of securing a cookie for himself . . . and it works! The duckling shares. As with the other titles in the Pigeon series, simple pencil drawings on pale, blank backgrounds focus our attention on the characters' interactions. Willems has an extraordinary ability to convey immediate, deep characterization with a few deft strokes. He knows, too, how to spread the action across a picture book, carefully managing the panels and page turns to ramp up the drama. Fans will delight at another outing, and the protagonist's indelible pigeonality will welcome newcomers to the club. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Pigeon is a beloved character, and his legions of fans will clamor for this, the seventh Pigeon book from hugely popular, award-winning Willems. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.





Everyone's favorite grouch of a fowl returns, though the spotlight is firmly fixed elsewhere. Never content to be merely a supporting character, The Pigeon nonetheless takes a backseat in a story in which The Duckling asks for and receives a cookie with nuts. Incensed, The Pigeon proceeds to rant about the various items and impossibilities he has asked for over the years, ignoring point blank the fact that The Duckling got her cookie by asking politely. At the end of the expected meltdown, the smaller bird reveals that she only got the cookie in the first place so that she could give it to The Pigeon. Flabbergasted ("Hubba— Whaa?!?"), our hero leaves with cookie in hand, and The Duckling reveals that her seeming sainthood—she shares slyness as well as color with Tweety Bird—may be a bit of an act. Even those who think they may have tired of The Pigeon's antics will find much to enjoy in this familiar but different outing. The importance of politeness is evident, but its delivery is not didactic in the least. Just as enjoyable as a read-aloud to a group or as a one-on-one lapsit, it's a pleasure to see Willems at the top of his game, and The Pigeon suitably humbled. (Picture book. 3-8) Copyright Kirkus 2012 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.






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