This Way, Charlie
by Levis, Caron; Santoso, Charles (ILT)






Jack, an introverted goat, and Charlie, a blind horse, meet at Open Bud Ranch, an animal rehabilitation center, and form an unlikely friendship that grows stronger in the face of adversity.





Caron Levis has an LMSW from Hunter College and an MFA in creative writing for children and young adults from The New School, where she now teaches and advises. She is the author of a number of picture books, including Ida, Always; Stop That Yawn!; and Mama&;s Work Shoes. Charles Santoso has illustrated several picture books, including I Don&;t Like Koala and The Snurtch by Sean Ferrell; Ida, Always by Caron Levis; and the Peanut Butter & books by Joe McGee. He lives and works in Singapore.
 





When Charlie the horse comes to live at Antonia's ranch for sick, injured, and anxious animals, Jack the goat initially has little patience with the big, amiable fellow, who nearly stumbles over him. Jack usually keeps to himself, but after he realizes that the horse is blind in one eye, he begins to watch out for Charlie and leads him to a pleasant field each day. Gradually, they become friends. During a thunderstorm, a falling tree traps the horse, and Jack runs for help. Antonia and the animals arrive to set him free. On their return, Jack follows Charlie into the barn, where all the animals snuggle together, warm and cozy. Based on a true story that took place on a wildlife ranch-sanctuary in Oklahoma, this picture book has a good deal to offer. The well-crafted, quiet text focuses on the two animals and tells their story in a simple, childlike manner. With rounded forms, soft edges, and layered colors, the illustrations create the characters and their varied moods expressively. An endearing story of animal friendship. Preschool-Grade 3. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





A standoffish goat forms a unique bond with a partially blind horse. Jack, a solitary goat, lives at Open Bud Ranch, where "all kinds" of animals come for space to "heal, rest, and grow." Jack, who likes "keeping his space to himself," is initially irritated when a horse named Charlie arrives, accidentally invading that space. Gradually, Jack realizes Charlie's blind in one eye. He watches Charlie greet everyone, sniff honeysuckles, and follow sunlit patches—but also bump into things and seem lost, scared, even lonely. One day, Jack beckons him: "This way, Charlie," guiding Charlie to his favorite grazing field. Soon Jack leads Charlie everywhere, and they become friends. After Charlie loses sight in his other eye, Jack simply moves closer to lead Charlie on their walks. Despite Charlie's urging, injuries from Jack's abused past prevent him from engaging other animals until Charlie's in danger and Jack must ask others for help. Inspired by a real-life relationship between a horse and a goat at an Oklahoma wildlife rescue and rehabilitati on center, this gentle story's positive messages about patience, kindness, and friendship are reinforced in soft illustrations that resemble impressionistic watercolors. Touching scenes of isolationist Jack watching Charlie from a distance gradually give way to upbeat scenes of Jack actively leading Charlie into a mutually healing friendship. Memorable and moving. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





A standoffish goat forms a unique bond with a partially blind horse. Jack, a solitary goat, lives at Open Bud Ranch, where "all kinds" of animals come for space to "heal, rest, and grow." Jack, who likes "keeping his space to himself," is initially irritated when a horse named Charlie arrives, accidentally invading that space. Gradually, Jack realizes Charlie's blind in one eye. He watches Charlie greet everyone, sniff honeysuckles, and follow sunlit patches—but also bump into things and seem lost, scared, even lonely. One day, Jack beckons him: "This way, Charlie," guiding Charlie to his favorite grazing field. Soon Jack leads Charlie everywhere, and they become friends. After Charlie loses sight in his other eye, Jack simply moves closer to lead Charlie on their walks. Despite Charlie's urging, injuries from Jack's abused past prevent him from engaging other animals until Charlie's in danger and Jack must ask others for help. Inspired by a real-life relationship between a horse and a goat at an Oklahoma wildlife rescue and rehabilitati on center, this gentle story's positive messages about patience, kindness, and friendship are reinforced in soft illustrations that resemble impressionistic watercolors. Touching scenes of isolationist Jack watching Charlie from a distance gradually give way to upbeat scenes of Jack actively leading Charlie into a mutually healing friendship. Memorable and moving. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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