Good Neighbor : The Life and Work of Fred Rogers
by King, Maxwell







Prologue: A Beautiful Day1(16)
PART I
1 Freddy
17(16)
2 Breathing Room
33(15)
3 College Days
48(6)
4 Love and Music
54(19)
PART II
5 Basic Training
73(17)
6 The Children's Corner
90(22)
7 On-Air Ministry
112(14)
8 Dr. Margaret McFarland
126(14)
9 Toronto and the CBC
140(15)
PART III
10 The Birth of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood
155(14)
11 The Pastore Hearing
169(9)
12 Language and Meaning
178(19)
13 Mister Rogers, Boss and Teacher
197(15)
14 Puppet World
212(17)
PART IV
15 On Hiatus
229(12)
16 He's Back!
241(16)
17 Behind the Scenes in the Neighborhood
257(14)
18 Fred Rogers, Musician
271(16)
19 Mister Rogers's Family Values
287(18)
20 Fearless Authenticity
305(12)
21 Swimming
317(8)
PART V
22 The Legacy
325(11)
23 The End of the Neighborhood
336(7)
24 America's Favorite Neighbor
343(10)
25 Mister Rogers Lives On
353(7)
Epilogue: A Personal Note on the Importance of Fred Rogers360(5)
Acknowledgments365(4)
Notes369(22)
Index391


Drawing on original interviews, oral histories and archival documents, the author traces Mr. Rogers' personal, professional and artistic life through decades of work. 50,000 first printing.





Maxwell King is the CEO of the Pittsburgh Foundation. After a career in journalism, including eight years as editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer, King served as president of the Pittsburgh-based Heinz Endowments for nearly a decade.





Sometimes, learning too much about a person can make his magic disappear. But in King's nearly 400-page biography of Fred Rogers, which thoroughly details everything from a bullied childhood (classmates called him Fat Freddy) to reflections on the psychological power of puppetry, the inimitable Mr. Rogers becomes somehow even more enchanting. In addition to elegantly narrating the facts of Rogers' life-a wealthy upbringing, his spiritual conviction and love of music, a lifelong commitment to early childhood education, commercial support paired with refusal to commercialize his namesake show-King's book brims with anecdotes of intimate exchanges that highlight Rogers' kindness and grace. Hours spent at the airport with a friend whose plane was delayed. A brief, calming conversation in an elevator with a television producer frantic over studio hiccups. A casual stroll with a little boy shocked to see his television idol on his very own block. "Deep and simple-that's what matters," Rogers used to say. King, Pittsburgh Foundation president and a former newspaper editor, counsels that, in our current political climate, we would do well to remember this credo today. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.





"The man who conveyed a Zen-like calm on television saw a psychiatrist for decades." So writes Pittsburgh-based nonprofit CEO King at one of many points in which he emphasizes that the beloved star of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood was a sometimes-contradictory fellow.Fred Rogers (1928-2003) was no saint, given to occasional outbursts of anger and not above a little deception in order to get out of sticky situations, as when he tried to separate himself from a company he effectively owned during a strike. Raised in the hardscrabble Rust Belt, Rogers escaped, going to work as a floor manager in the early days of TV and making a mark with the 1951 production of Amahl and the Night Visitors, "a high point in NBC's creative period." He could have followed a path to an executive role with the network, but he returned to Pittsburgh and pioneered a different kind of TV aimed at children—different because, King writes, it actually respected its audience. Rogers was an emphatic and empathetic Christian who wanted to impart those values to his audience, but by the author's account, he saw the world—or at least the show he built—with the eyes of a child and insisted that those who worked for him do the same. As a former producer noted, whenever anyone was reading aloud onscreen, the camera showed the words and tracked from left to right to mimic the path of the eyes in reading: "All those little tiny details were really important to Fred." Though indifferently written and sometimes scattered, King's book is resolute on the turns Rogers took in order to be sure that his show not be the usual pandering, cereal-selling child's fare, passing up a fortune in the bargain. A bonus: the author's revelation of the role Rogers played in getting Monty Python on the air in America. Serviceable overall, but strong in its demonstration that Rogers was not just a good neighbor and a good friend to children, but also a very good man. Copyright Kirkus 2018 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2018 Follett School Solutions