I Really Want the Cake
by Philip, Simon; Gaggiotti, Lucia (ILT)






A spunky and relatable young heroine whimsically tries to resist a mouthwatering chocolate cake with the support of her loyal pup sidekick, in a tale that explores themes of impulse control, truth telling and making amends. Simultaneous eBook. Illustrations.





Simon Philip is a primary school teacher and picture book author. He lives in Chichester, England. You can find him online at simon-philip.com.

Lucia Gaggiotti is a graphic designer and artist and the illustrator of How Did That Get in My Lunchbox? and Where Did My Clothes Come From?, both written by Chris Butterworth. Lucia Gaggiotti lives in London. You can find her online at luciagaggiotti.com.





Cake lust wins out over parental command, as it all too often does. Faced with a huge, luscious, forbidden chocolate cake, a child struggles to stay away but ultimately caves as one lick becomes a feeding frenzy that leaves only crumbs. Well . . . how hard can it be to make another? Rhyming verse accompanies a winning young gourmand with wild black hair and a big personality, and Gaggiotti proves a dab hand at depicting fantastically smeary disaster areas around the cake plate and in the kitchen. Nonetheless, the extravagantly decorated jumble she dishes up at the end has a stylish flair that hints at a bright future as a pastry chef. A scratch recipe at the end offers a similarly mouthwatering but more feasible project for younger bakers. One caveat: in the illustrations, the child has a pooch who freely joins her in chowing down on the chocolate. A word of warning to younger pet owners may be in order. Grades K-2. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





A child and a dog fight a losing battle to resist a tempting—but forbidden—chocolate cake. Each step in this hilarious struggle is narrated by the child in a three-line rhyme that culminates in an increasingly emotional refrain (in fun type to match) as the battle for self-control escalates. "I think I want the cake" leads to "You must not eat the cake" and "I must... / ... forget the cake" until "I'm going BACK for cake." Undone, the child licks the cake, then takes a bite—and then dog and child annihilate the cake. "I know I've not been very wise. / And what I've done I can't disguise. / I might have to apologize... / ...because I ate the cake." To make amends, the child, who's never baked, decides to replace the cake. "It's EASY making cake!" until things go wrong. Eggs smash on the table, batter splatters, and a predictable mess engulfs the kitchen, child, and dog. Despite stress and mess, the child is at last able to say, "but hey, I've made you cake!" And it's a delightfully decorated cake at that. Multipanel spreads with exuberantly scribbly cartoon il lustrations keep the action moving, and close-ups of the pale-skinned, black-haired child's face capture the emotional turmoil that ensues. This humorous struggle for self-control also models apology and restitution. (Picture book. 3-8) Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





A child and a dog fight a losing battle to resist a tempting—but forbidden—chocolate cake. Each step in this hilarious struggle is narrated by the child in a three-line rhyme that culminates in an increasingly emotional refrain (in fun type to match) as the battle for self-control escalates. "I think I want the cake" leads to "You must not eat the cake" and "I must... / ... forget the cake" until "I'm going BACK for cake." Undone, the child licks the cake, then takes a bite—and then dog and child annihilate the cake. "I know I've not been very wise. / And what I've done I can't disguise. / I might have to apologize... / ...because I ate the cake." To make amends, the child, who's never baked, decides to replace the cake. "It's EASY making cake!" until things go wrong. Eggs smash on the table, batter splatters, and a predictable mess engulfs the kitchen, child, and dog. Despite stress and mess, the child is at last able to say, "but hey, I've made you cake!" And it's a delightfully decorated cake at that. Multipanel spreads with exuberantly scribbly cartoon il lustrations keep the action moving, and close-ups of the pale-skinned, black-haired child's face capture the emotional turmoil that ensues. This humorous struggle for self-control also models apology and restitution. (Picture book. 3-8) Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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