Light in Hidden Places
by Cameron, Sharon






Secretly falling in love with the son of Jewish grocers in 1943 Poland, a young Catholic singer is devastated when the family is arrested by Nazis who requisition her house, complicating her effort to protect her beloved's hidden brother. Simultaneous eBook.





Sharon Cameron's debut novel The Dark Unwinding was awarded the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators' Sue Alexander Award for Most Promising New Work and the SCBWI Crystal Kite Award, and was named a YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults selection. Sharon is also the author of its sequel, A Spark Unseen; Rook, which was selected as an Indiebound Indie Next List Top Ten selection, a YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults selection, and a Parents' Choice gold medalist; and The Forgetting, a #1 New York Times bestseller and an Indie Next Pick of the List selection, and its companion novel, The Knowing. She lives with her family in Nashville, Tennessee, and you can visit her online at sharoncameronbooks.com.





Sixteen-year-old Stefania Podgorska lives with the Diamant family in Przemysl, Poland, during WWII. When, in 1943, the German army invades her town, her adopted Jewish family is rounded up with other Jews and sent to the ghetto. Stefania is left behind, but she-while also caring for her abandoned six-year-old sister, Helena-agrees to hide Max Diamant and his friends, who escaped the ghetto. For almost two years, Stefania and Helena live in absolute fear of being discovered and killed for helping Jews. Young adult author Cameron (The Knowing, 2017) returns with a new read that conveys the true story of a young Polish girl who hides 13 Jews in her attic. Similar to Kathy Kacer's The Sound of Freedom (2018), Cameron's latest is set during WWII in Poland but gives a more thorough account of the terror that reigned during the war. Empowered by thorough research-an author's note details events after the war-Cameron successfully conveys horror and bravery in this powerful and captivating novel. A memorable read. Grades 8-10. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





Sixteen-year-old Stefania Podgorska lives with the Diamant family in Przemysl, Poland, during WWII. When, in 1943, the German army invades her town, her adopted Jewish family is rounded up with other Jews and sent to the ghetto. Stefania is left behind, but she-while also caring for her abandoned six-year-old sister, Helena-agrees to hide Max Diamant and his friends, who escaped the ghetto. For almost two years, Stefania and Helena live in absolute fear of being discovered and killed for helping Jews. Young adult author Cameron (The Knowing, 2017) returns with a new read that conveys the true story of a young Polish girl who hides 13 Jews in her attic. Similar to Kathy Kacer's The Sound of Freedom (2018), Cameron's latest is set during WWII in Poland but gives a more thorough account of the terror that reigned during the war. Empowered by thorough research-an author's note details events after the war-Cameron successfully conveys horror and bravery in this powerful and captivating novel. A memorable read. Grades 8-10. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





A true story of faith, love, and heroism. Stefania "Fusia" Podg├│rska longed for nothing more than to leave the rural Polish farm she was born on for the city of Przemy┼?l where her older sisters lived. At the age of 12, she did just that, finding a job with the Diamants, a family of Jewish shopkeepers who welcomed her into their lives. For three years they lived peacefully until the Germans dropped bombs on Przemy┼?l. The family struggled on as the war and anti-Semitism ramped up, but eventually, the Diamants were forced into a ghetto. Then 17, Catholic Fusia was determined to help them survive, even at the risk of her own safety, while also caring for her 6-year-old sister, Helena, after their family was taken by the Nazis for forced labor. Knowing the risks involved, Fusia made a bold decision to harbor Jews. As the number of people she sheltered increased, so did her panic about being caught, but she was determined to do what was right. Cameron (The Knowing, 2017, etc.) used Stefania's unpublished memoir as well as interviews with family members as source material. She deftly details Fusia's brave actions and includes moving family photographs in the author's note. Narrated in the first person, the story highlights essential events in Fusia's life while maintaining a consistent pace. Readers will be pulled in by the compelling opening and stay for the emotional journey. An inspirational read. (author's note) (Historical fiction. 13-18) Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





I go to the door, pressing an ear to the wood before I turn the lock. The empty hall outside our room stretches to the other empty rooms of the empty apartment. As it should. Everything is as it should be.

And then a noise shoots through the silence. Louder than a gun. A grenade of fear inside my chest. And I know the sound I have missed.

Someone is knocking on my front door.

They know. They know. They know.

The words beat with my blood.

Another mattress spring pops, and I feel Helena coming up behind me. She doesn't speak. She is six years old and doesn't have to be told that this is not the time for questions.

The knocking comes again, louder, this time with a whisper through the cracks.

"Stefania?"

It's a trick. The Gestapo want me to open the door without a fuss. So they don't have to break it down. So they can give a nice, unblemished apartment to some nice German officer and his law-abiding wife with clean hair and mended stockings.

Maybe this means they will shoot us outside, like Mr. Schwarzer.

The whisper comes again.

"Open the door! Fusia!"

The Gestapo does not know me by that name.

I run for the door, hands out, fingers already searching for the newly repaired lock. I know it isn't him. It can't be him. But I fumble and twist at the lock anyway, then fling open the door. Helena gasps. Or maybe the gasp came from me. Because the bare bulb hanging in the hallway has shown me that it's not him. It's not who I thought it would be at all.






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