Broken Faith : Inside the Word of Faith Fellowship, One of America's Most Dangerous Cults
by Weiss, Mitch; Mohr, Holbrook







Quote17(2)
Introduction19(2)
PART ONE In the Beginning
21(96)
Prologue: The Escape
23(4)
1 Moving Day, September 19, 1993
27(8)
2 Settling In
35(17)
3 A Fox in the Flock
52(12)
4 Busted
64(12)
5 The Attack
76(14)
6 The Investigation
90(14)
7 Little House in the Country
104(13)
PART TWO Children of the Damned
117(110)
8 Doubting the Word
119(8)
9 No Escape
127(11)
10 The Five Boys
138(9)
11 "Happy Are the Children"
147(6)
12 Surrogate Parents
153(7)
13 Money and Influence
160(13)
14 Religious Freedom
173(7)
15 "We Won. We Won!"
180(10)
16 The "Slaves"
190(17)
17 The Loneliest Day
207(20)
PART THREE The Advocates
227(131)
18 Saving Michael Lowry
229(14)
19 A Little Help from His Friends
243(14)
20 The Ruse
257(16)
21 Matthew Fenner
273(15)
22 Danielle's Salvation
288(10)
23 The Wedding
298(8)
24 The Fight for Justice
306(10)
25 The Escape
316(17)
26 Perseverance and Redemption
333(15)
27 The Reunion
348(10)
Epilogue358(25)
Acknowledgments383(2)
Glossary385(2)
Notes on Sources387(20)
Books407(2)
Newspapers409


An investigation into the Word of Faith Fellowship cult traces its 1979 origins through its expansion across three continents, sharing insights into Jane Whaley's abusive and absolute control over her followers. 100,000 first printing.





*Starred Review* A charismatic leader, members who cut ties to their families, and extreme emotional and physical abuse all characterize Word of Faith Fellowship as represented by AP reporters Weiss and Mohr in this fascinating and deeply researched investigation. The former members they interviewed for this book lived in a community that, as the authors report it, can only be summarized as a cult. Word of Faith Fellowship, a close-knit church in North Carolina, and its leader Jane Whaley seem to dodge prosecution with relative ease despite numerous reports of abuse and fraud regarding Whaley and other church leaders. From the relatively benign banning of television to dictating when her followers will have sex and whom they will marry, Whaley reportedly rules over her church with impunity. Her "blasting" technique, which involves screaming at and occasionally physically abusing a person in order to expel demons, is a pillar of her theology, and used not only in her North Carolina church, but in affiliate congregations in Brazil. Compelling in its evidence, this shocking narrative examines the bonds of family, the limits of endurance, and how far people will go to save their souls. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





*Starred Review* A charismatic leader, members who cut ties to their families, and extreme emotional and physical abuse all characterize Word of Faith Fellowship as represented by AP reporters Weiss and Mohr in this fascinating and deeply researched investigation. The former members they interviewed for this book lived in a community that, as the authors report it, can only be summarized as a cult. Word of Faith Fellowship, a close-knit church in North Carolina, and its leader Jane Whaley seem to dodge prosecution with relative ease despite numerous reports of abuse and fraud regarding Whaley and other church leaders. From the relatively benign banning of television to dictating when her followers will have sex and whom they will marry, Whaley reportedly rules over her church with impunity. Her "blasting" technique, which involves screaming at and occasionally physically abusing a person in order to expel demons, is a pillar of her theology, and used not only in her North Carolina church, but in affiliate congregations in Brazil. Compelling in its evidence, this shocking narrative examines the bonds of family, the limits of endurance, and how far people will go to save their souls. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





A fly-on-the-wall account of a religious cult and its discontents. Headquartered in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, the Word of Faith Fellowship has a long pedigree—and has long attracted the interest of law enforcement, write Associated Press reporters Weiss (The Heart of Hell: The Untold Story of Courage and Sacrifice in the Shadow of Iwo Jima, 2016, etc.) and Mohr. The founder, Jane Whaley, is "a godlike figure who professe[s] to have all the answers," a woman quick to disappear with the collection plate—and who, the authors charge, was instrumental in the disappearance of an emerald so rare that the Brazilian government has been trying to retrieve it, the consequence of the church's expansion not just into that country but also in other entrepĂ´ts around the world. The authors open with the daring escape, literally, of a church member and his wife, two refugees among 100 or so who have fled from the church and whose testimony provides the basis for this book—in addition to several law enforcement reports. In terestingly and ominously, some of those reports were never filed, and some were never even written thanks to the intercession of officials sympathetic to or supported by the WFF. Whaley, a charismatic leader surrounded by vulnerable followers and strong-arm lieutenants, has since sheltered herself in several ways, including forging political ties to the Trump administration and the Republican hierarchy in North Carolina. Meanwhile, amid such cultlike activities as dictating whom church members are allowed to marry, preaching a doctrine in which "sex is evil and demonic" and only the missionary position is acceptable, administering beatings to suspected apostates, and so forth, Whaley "has amassed millions." Ominously, the authors note at the end, one church higher-up has lately acquired a license to transport cyanide, the potential recipe for another Jonestown. A compelling examination of a Christianist cabal whose crimes are evident but whose power seems, for the moment, unbreakable. Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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