Silent Patient
by Michaelides, Alex; Brealey, Louise (NRT); Hawkins, Jack (NRT)






Criminal psychotherapist Theo Faber becomes dangerously obsessed with uncovering the truth about what prompted his client, an artist who refuses to speak, to violently murder her husband in a way that triggers mass public speculation.





Alex Michaelides was born in Cyprus in 1977 to a Greek-Cypriot father and an English mother. He studied English literature at Cambridge University and got his MA in screenwriting at the American Film Institute in Los Angeles. The Silent Patient is his first novel.





Psychotherapist Theo Faber is fascinated by the case of Alicia Berenson, a noted artist who shot and killed her photographer husband six years ago, but who hasn't spoken since then. Convinced he can help her, Theo applies for a position at The Grove, the mental health facility where she is a patient. Hawkins voices Theo's endless internalizing about his childhood, personal life, and obsession with Alicia, alternating between hesitant and forthright speech. Alicia's actions at The Grove are an early clue to her personality, but the real Alicia becomes evident in diary entries that reveal her pre-murder activities and feelings, read in Brealey's quiet, wistful, young girl's voice. Throughout, Hawkins' speech ranges from forceful to sympathetic, angry to solicitous, while Brealey speaks more evenly. The engrossing narration by two Brits enhances a weaving, twisted psychological debut. An end-of-audio interview with the author offers insight into the writing of the novel. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.





Psychotherapist Theo Faber is fascinated by the case of Alicia Berenson, a noted artist who shot and killed her photographer husband six years ago, but who hasn?t spoken since then. Convinced he can help her, Theo applies for a position at The Grove, the mental health facility where she is a patient. Hawkins voices Theo?s endless internalizing about his childhood, personal life, and obsession with Alicia, alternating between hesitant and forthright speech. Alicia?s actions at The Grove are an early clue to her personality, but the real Alicia becomes evident in diary entries that reveal her pre-murder activities and feelings, read in Brealey?s quiet, wistful, young girl?s voice. Throughout, Hawkins' speech ranges from forceful to sympathetic, angry to solicitous, while Brealey speaks more evenly. The engrossing narration by two Brits enhances a weaving, twisted psychological debut. An end-of-audio interview with the author offers insight into the writing of the novel. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.






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