American Rebels : How the Hancock, Adams, and Quincy Families Fanned the Flames of Revolution
by Sankovitch, Nina







Map of Boston and Environs, 1700s
ix
Map of Boston Before the Revolution
x
Map of Philadelphia, 1774-1776
xi
Map of the Village of Braintree During the Time of American Rebels
xii
The Families of Braintreexiii
PART ONE Tinder(1744-1764)
1(2)
Prologue: A Village Mourns
3(6)
1 Founding a Village
9(7)
2 The Education of Boys
16(8)
3 Worldly Goods, Heavenly Debates
24(8)
4 The Education of Girls
32(9)
5 Changing Fortunes
41(10)
6 Colonial Enthusiasms
51(8)
PART TWO Spark (1765-1773)
59(2)
7 The Mobs of Boston
61(12)
8 Warmest Lovers of Liberty
73(11)
9 A Watchful Spirit
84(12)
10 The Arrival of Troops
96(12)
11 Portents of a Comet
108(16)
13 Mayhem and Massacre
124(9)
14 On Trial
133(12)
15 Retreat to Braintree
145(10)
16 Patriots Assemble
155(11)
17 Branching Out
166(12)
18 Anxiety and Apprehensions
178(9)
19 Tea, That Baneful Weed
187(10)
PART THREE Flame (1774--1776)
197(2)
20 Rocks and Quicksands on Every Side
199(10)
21 Punishment and Indignation
209(13)
22 Grand Object of Their View
222(6)
23 In the Cause of Liberty
228(9)
24 On This Island, This England
237(9)
25 Sharpening Quills and Swords
246(11)
26 Ship in a Storm
257(8)
27 Lexington and Concord
265(9)
28 Clouds over Boston
274(13)
29 The Unhappy Contest
287(12)
30 Complications of Evil and Misfortune
299(13)
31 Surrender of Boston
312(13)
32 Debating Separation
325(12)
33 The Signature of Independence
337(9)
Epilogue: Friends to Mankind346(5)
Acknowledgments351(2)
Notes353(30)
Bibliography383(4)
Index387


Explores, for the first time, the intertwined lives of the Hancock, Quincy, and Adams families, and the role each person played in sparking the American Revolution. Illustrations. Maps.





Nina Sankovitch is the author of several nonfiction books, including American Rebels and The Lowells of Massachusetts. She has written for the New York Times, the Huffington Post as a contributing blogger, and was formerly a judge for The Book of the Month Club. A graduate of Tufts University and Harvard Law School, Sankovitch grew up in Evanston, Illinois, and currently lives in Connecticut with her family.





In the mid-eighteenth century, three Braintree, Massachusetts, families began setting the stage for what was to become the American Revolution. The Hancocks were one of the colonies' richest families, having profited from government contracts during the French and Indian War. The Quincys had large landholdings in Massachusetts. The Adams family were early settlers in Braintree. They all appeared prosperous burghers, but they learned early on to respect others and to cherish both this equality and its companion, liberty. These families intermarried, their children attended the same schools in Braintree and Boston, and they all socialized leisurely on the town common. So as relations with Britain over the imposition of duties and taxes began to strain, leaders from each of these families took up the banner of revolt against their overseas government. Sankovitch (The Lowells of Massachusetts, 2017) lays out the evolution of eighteenth-century political thought and shows how it arose within these families and their interconnections. Students of American Revolution history will find a fresh perspective here. Maps and genealogies help orient readers. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





In the mid-eighteenth century, three Braintree, Massachusetts, families began setting the stage for what was to become the American Revolution. The Hancocks were one of the colonies' richest families, having profited from government contracts during the French and Indian War. The Quincys had large landholdings in Massachusetts. The Adams family were early settlers in Braintree. They all appeared prosperous burghers, but they learned early on to respect others and to cherish both this equality and its companion, liberty. These families intermarried, their children attended the same schools in Braintree and Boston, and they all socialized leisurely on the town common. So as relations with Britain over the imposition of duties and taxes began to strain, leaders from each of these families took up the banner of revolt against their overseas government. Sankovitch (The Lowells of Massachusetts, 2017) lays out the evolution of eighteenth-century political thought and shows how it arose within these families and their interconnections. Students of American Revolution history will find a fresh perspective here. Maps and genealogies help orient readers. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





A look at the road to the American Revolution from the perspectives of five patriots. On July 2, 1776, the Second Continental Congress, presided over by John Hancock, declared independence from Britain, prompting delegate John Adams to write to his wife, Abigail, that the "Second Day of July 1776, will be the most memorable Epocha, in the History of America." This moment provides a fitting conclusion to this book, in which Sankovitch (The Lowells of Massachusetts: An American Family, 2017, etc.) argues that Hancock, the Adamses, Josiah Quincy Jr., and Dorothy Quincy Hancock together "led the fight for liberty" that culminated in the Revolution. John Hancock, John Adams, and Edmund and Samuel Quincy were childhood companions, the "Boys from Braintree" who attended Harvard together. In the years following the French and Indian War, Hancock, Adams, and Josiah often collaborated in response to British Colonial policies. Hancock and Quincy worked on an official protest against the Stamp Act, Adams was Hancock's defense counsel in the Liberty case, and Hancock and Q uincy helped organize the Boston Tea Party. Sankovitch persuasively claims the importance of the somewhat forgotten Josiah, a brilliant lawyer who succumbed to tuberculosis in April 1775 at the age of 31. She is less convincing in asserting the significance of Abigail Smith Adams and Dorothy Quincy Hancock. The author also commits too many factual errors: The Puritans were not separatists. Thomas Hutchinson was not the governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay in August 1765. The committee charged with writing the Declaration of Independence consisted of five men, not six. John Adams was elected president in 1796, not 1797. Sankovitch also contradicts herself when she notes that Abigail Adams anticipated war with Britain ("inevitable, in her view") after the Boston Tea Party only to write that she and others thought war was "still unthinkable" after that event. An occasionally enlightening study hampered by the author's missteps. Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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