This Is the Way the World Ends : How Droughts and Die-Offs, Heat Waves and Hurricanes Are Converging on America
by Nesbit, Jeff







Introduction: Harbingerix
PART 1 THE TRUTH
1(50)
1 Einstein's Warning
3(11)
2 Species on the Move
14(9)
3 The Third Pole
23(9)
4 Collapse of the Pollinators
32(9)
5 The "Evil Twin"
41(10)
PART 2 THE ECOSYSTEMS
51(32)
6 Regime Shift
53(8)
7 The Sahel
61(11)
8 Ocean Colonies
72(11)
PART 3 THE IMPACTS
83(42)
9 Dome of Heat
85(10)
10 Category 6
95(10)
11 The Displaced
105(10)
12 Vanishing Icons
115(10)
PART 4 THE GEOPOLITICS
125(106)
13 Seeing Around Corners
127(9)
14 The Water Economy
136(12)
15 Saudi Arabia
148(9)
16 Yemen
157(10)
17 Syria
167(9)
18 Jordan
176(8)
19 Somalia
184(8)
20 Pakistan
192(8)
21 India
200(9)
22 China
209(11)
23 Environmental Diplomacy
220(11)
PART 5 THE BLUEPRINT
231(26)
24 A Path Forward
233(6)
25 Disruption
239(7)
26 Waking the Behemoths
246(5)
27 The Anvil
251(6)
PART 6 THE FUTURE
257(18)
28 Political Morality
259(5)
29 Our Next Gate
264(11)
Acknowledgments275(2)
Notes277(30)
Bibliography URL307(2)
Index309


Argues that current environmental and social disasters are evidence of a single pending crisis, which will reach the tipping point in less than a generation, ending human civilization, unless attitudes change, and suggests solutions,





JEFF NESBIT was the director of public affairs for two federal science agencies and a senior communications official at the White House. Now the executive director of Climate Nexus, he is a contributing writer for The New York Times, Time, U.S. News & World Report, Axios, and Quartz. Nesbit is the author of Poison Tea in addition to dozens of novels. He lives in New York.





*Starred Review* Journalist and former National Science Foundation executive Nesbit (Poison Tea, 2016) acknowledges that he tells "big, scary stories." His brand of stories scares more than standard tales of global warming and climate change because they are specific and immediate and foreshadow our own fate. Nesbit reports on countries that currently suffer from drought, natural-resource depletion, overpopulation, and societal destabilization, including Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Pakistan, China, North Korea, and India. Because many Americans with air conditioning and economic safety nets don't recognize these foreign stories as threats, Nesbit also covers the water depletion in California's Central Valley, where one-third of the world's food is produced, and the wildly destructive Category-6 hurricanes now hitting our Gulf and Atlantic Coasts. Nesbit's overall message is that we need to act now to lessen climate change for humans' very survival-not just to save whales and polar bears. Perhaps surprisingly, Nesbit still hopes that we can reduce global warming, because a shift to low-carbon energy can be economically and politically profitable. Mostly free of technical jargon and confusing scientific explanations, Nesbit's book should be widely read. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.





A passionate overview of human-induced global warming whose effect on climate, agriculture, ecosystems, and extinction is approaching a point of no return. In 30 short yet detailed chapters, journalist Nesbit (Poison Tea: How Big Oil and Big Tobacco Invented the Tea Party and Captured the GOP, 2016)—a former White House communications official who is now the executive director of Climate Nexus—explains the science behind climate change, how it affects specific nations today, and the far more dismal afflictions that are just around the corner unless nations can get their acts together. The 10 hottest years in human history have occurred since the turn of the century. The major cause, atmospheric carbon dioxide, is not only rising faster than ever, but will continue to rise for decades after we stop adding to it—which we are doing at an alarming rate. Shrinking ice at the Earth's poles may be of less concern than the vanishing snowpack and glaciers at the so-c alled "Third Pole": the Himalayas, which serve as a source of water for over 1 billion people. Readers may find modest hope in the obligatory how-to-fix-it final chapters. Many world leaders worry about climate change, and some are trying to help. This is not the case in the United States, where, bizarrely, the subject has become politicized. Democrats accept its reality, and Nesbit praises former President Barack Obama for his warnings, neglecting to add that he took no action. Still, this is preferable to Congressional Republicans who consider it a liberal affectation. Thus, offended on discovering a CIA research project on the effect of global warming on national security, they cut off funding. An above-average example of the stream of similar books pouring off the presses. That there is a large audience for this genre is a cause for optimism—perhaps the only one. Copyright Kirkus 2018 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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