Just in Case You Want to Fly
by Fogliano, Julie; Robinson, Christian (ILT)






Offers encouragement and supplies, from a snack and a blanket to a map for finding the way home, to a loved one who may be facing a new challenge.





Julie Fogliano is an author of bestselling children's books, including A House That Once Was, illustrated by Lane Smith, When Green Becomes Tomatoes, illustrated by Julie Morstad, and And Then It's Spring and If You Want to See a Whale, both illustrated by Erin E. Stead. She lives in the Hudson Valley in New York.

Christian Robinson is an acclaimed illustrator of children's books, including Gaston by Kelly di Puchhio and the New York Times bestseller Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña, which won the Newbery Medal as well as a Caldecott Honor. He also illustrated School's First Day of School by Adam Rex, recipient of seven starred reviews and a New York Times Bestseller. He has collaborated with Julie Fogliano on When's My Birthday? Which received five starred reviews and was named a 2018 Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Book.





*Starred Review* Fogliano's endearing rhyming text offers encouraging words for one who wants to take off and explore-and it includes references to some handy equipment to take along. Whether the reader is leaving for kindergarten, summer camp, or college, the words offer reassurance that you're free to leave home knowing there are loving arms ready and waiting for your return. In striking paint and collage artwork, Robinson uses a simple, flat perspective that employs the colors of burgundy, tan, black, and gray with punches of red and blue on pure white backdrops and presents sweet pictures with a multicultural cast of children. Going away on one's own can elicit varying emotions, and the text takes those into account: "Just in case you want to sing / here's a la la la / and a ding ding ding" contrasts with "just in case you want to cry / here's a tissue / and here's a sigh." Images of things that fly include birds, butterflies, airplanes-paper and propeller-and a superhero's cape. The final double-page spread reveals a child being lovingly tucked into bed with a bedspread that's covered with pictures of the items mentioned in the rhymes. A charming assurance about letting go of the things you love, from the creators of When's My Birthday? (2017). Preschool-Grade 1. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.





Fogliano and Robinson (When's My Birthday?, 2017) collaborate again, this time in the voice of a caregiver speaking to a beloved child. "Just in case you want to fly / here's some wind / and here's the sky." A smiling child looks out of an apartment window as clothes on a line sway in the wind. "Here's a feather / here's up high / and here's a wing / from a butterfly"—the former is on a banner drawn by an airplane; the latter beckons visitors into a museum, both in a cityscape spread. More potential needs and wants are anticipated and solved with offers of a cherry for a snack, a rock to skip, a coin to wish, a joke. Some of the offers are comfort-driven and bedtime-themed: The final spread, "and here is a map / with an x on the spot / to find your way / home to me," shows a child in bed being tucked in with a blanket covered with many of the objects from the book. Robinson's recognizable collage-and-paint illustrations are sweet as ever, featuring children diverse in skin color and hair texture. The rhyming text reads almost like Goodnight Moon's, although it has a more-explicit expression of love for the child listener. Simple and nurturing, this will likely be loved by many a parent-child pair. (Picture book. 2-7) Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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