Last Girl Ghosted
by Unger, Lisa






Believing she had found true love on a dating app, a young woman is shocked when her lover intentionally disappears and she discovers many other girls who also thought they were in love with the same man. 100,000 first printing.





Wren meets Adam through a dating app, looking for a quick hookup, only to end up totally infatuated with him. And then he vanishes. No phone, no current online presence. She has been ghosted. She has had a profitable career as an advice columnist, although she describes herself as a freelance writer. The unsavory side of peddling gossip is not all Wren has to hide, and perhaps she told Adam too much too soon, and he's just avoiding her. But Adam has secrets of his own. As Wren looks deeper into his digital past and has a visit from a private investigator who is also looking for him, she learns there were others who also fell under his spell. And they have gone missing. Unger has said that "plot flows from the characters," and the finely nuanced Wren is a perfect example of such a character, leading the reader through an immersive tale of passion and vengeance with a startling ending. Unger's Confessions on the 7:45 (2020) was a number-one best-seller and named one of Booklist's top-10 crime novels for 2020-21. Copyright 2021 Booklist Reviews.





A psychological thriller spins a dark tale of hidden identities and buried pasts. Wren Greenwood is skeptical about looking for love, or even for a hookup, online. But one of her best friends, vivacious Jax, presses her. At 28, Wren is totally focused on her job writing and podcasting an advice column called "Dear Birdie." She's so intent on helping her audience with their personal lives she barely has one of her own. So Wren signs up for a Tinder-like service called Torch, and there he is. Adam Harper, broodingly attractive, enigmatic-and quoting Rilke in his profile. Rilke fan Wren falls for him as soon as they meet, and for a few months it's bliss. Then he vanishes. She's hurt and bewildered-and then she's frightened, as what she thought she knew about his identity seems to be an opaque mask. But why is she getting strange texts from unknown numbers, catching glimpses of a tall figure watching her from a distance? Then a private detective named Bailey Kirk starts asking questions about another woman who connected online with a man who looks like Adam-a woman who has disappeared. Unger crafts Wren's first-person narration skillfully, creating an engaging, witty character and drawing the reader into her life and only slowly revealing that she has secrets of her own. Almost no one in this thriller is who they appear to be. Unger always ratchets up the tension, and the revelations, in her final chapters. But in this book, she spins like Simone Biles-and sticks the landing. A young woman's foray into online dating becomes a heartbreak-and then a deadly nightmare. Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





A psychological thriller spins a dark tale of hidden identities and buried pasts. Wren Greenwood is skeptical about looking for love, or even for a hookup, online. But one of her best friends, vivacious Jax, presses her. At 28, Wren is totally focused on her job writing and podcasting an advice column called "Dear Birdie." She's so intent on helping her audience with their personal lives she barely has one of her own. So Wren signs up for a Tinder-like service called Torch, and there he is. Adam Harper, broodingly attractive, enigmatic-and quoting Rilke in his profile. Rilke fan Wren falls for him as soon as they meet, and for a few months it's bliss. Then he vanishes. She's hurt and bewildered-and then she's frightened, as what she thought she knew about his identity seems to be an opaque mask. But why is she getting strange texts from unknown numbers, catching glimpses of a tall figure watching her from a distance? Then a private detective named Bailey Kirk starts asking questions about another woman who connected online with a man who looks like Adam-a woman who has disappeared. Unger crafts Wren's first-person narration skillfully, creating an engaging, witty character and drawing the reader into her life and only slowly revealing that she has secrets of her own. Almost no one in this thriller is who they appear to be. Unger always ratchets up the tension, and the revelations, in her final chapters. But in this book, she spins like Simone Biles-and sticks the landing. A young woman's foray into online dating becomes a heartbreak-and then a deadly nightmare. Copyright Kirkus 2021 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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