Oath of Office
by Cameron, Marc






When a change of regimes in Iran presents new opportunities for a balance of power in the region, President Jack Ryan becomes a lone Western voice urging caution in the wake of an international arms dealer's rise to power.





A little more than thirty years ago, Tom Clancy was a Maryland insurance broker with a passion for naval history. Years before, he had been an English major at Baltimore's Loyola College and had always dreamed of writing a novel. His first effort, The Hunt for Red October, sold briskly as a result of rave reviews, then catapulted onto the New York Times bestseller list after President Reagan pronounced it "the perfect yarn." From that day forward, Clancy established himself as an undisputed master at blending exceptional realism and authenticity, intricate plotting, and razor-sharp suspense. He passed away in October 2013.

A native of Texas, Marc Cameron spent twenty-nine years in law enforcement. He served as a uniformed police officer, mounted (horse patrol) officer, SWAT officer, and a U.S. Marshal. Cameron is conversant in Japanese, and travels extensively researching his New York Times-bestselling Jericho Quinn novels. Cameron's books have been nominated for both the Barry Award and the Thriller Award.





The spirit of Tom Clancy lives on as two generations of Jack Ryans continue to save America's cookies (Power and Empire, 2017, etc.) in this doorstop-sized thriller. President Jack Ryan has plenty of domestic problems—flooding down South, an outbreak of flu, faked videos showing him in a bad light, and the hateful Sen. Michelle Chadwick, who spouts dangerous lies about him. Certain Russians want to kill Chadwick and cause Ryan to be blamed. (Ha! As if the Ruskies would ever interfere in America's business.) Meanwhile, Jack Junior, "the first born son of the immortal Jack Ryan," is in the middle of the action overseas. An American woman is kidnapped in Cameroon. In Portugal, Junior's cohort Ding Chavez surveils an "international arms dealer and fat man of intrigue" who is conspiring with the Russians on an incredibly profitable scheme involving nukes for Iran. A Russian aircraft vanishes, probably carrying nuclear material. The story has the staple characters such as Joh n Clark, Ding, and Mary Pat Foley, but more interesting are the lesser folk like Lucile Fournier, the sexy killer and self-described "very nasty woman," to whom readers had best not get too attached. There is Yazdani, the desperate father of a child with cystic fibrosis, who will trade military secrets for medicine if only he can trust Jack Junior. And Ysabel, who might be the love of Junior's life if only he had the time. But no one reads Clancy for romance, anyway. Readers want global conflicts, fight scenes, and heroics. The Ryans are the idealized American heroes—they may be imperfect like you and me, but they have no fundamental flaws and even tolerate their haters: "Kindness came naturally to [President] Jack Ryan," but bad guys "do not want to test me." Author Cameron's storytelling is indistinguishable from the late Clancy's, down to infodumps that bulk up what could be a much shorter novel. An enjoyable read for Clancy fans. Copyright Kirkus 2018 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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