Guts
by Telgemeier, Raina; Lamb, Braden (ILT)






A funny and heartfelt coming-of-age story about a girl who's just trying to get through the day.





Raina Telgemeier is the #1 New York Times bestselling, multiple Eisner Award-winning creator of Smile and Sisters, which are both graphic memoirs based on her childhood. She is also the creator of Drama and Ghosts, and is the adapter and illustrator of four Baby-sitters Club graphic novels. Raina lives in the San Francisco Bay Area. To learn more, visit her online at goRaina.com.





After a particularly bad bout of the flu in fourth grade, Raina keeps having stomach aches and intense feelings about food and germs. The thought of being near a sick person sends her into a panic, and conflicts among her friends at school and embarrassment about bodily functions in general certainly don't help matters. In this third graphic memoir, Telgemeier describes her childhood anxiety in an approachable, nonjudgmental way and emphasizes how useful talk therapy can be. Her depiction of her spiraling anxious thoughts, often in noxious greens and crowded by negative self-talk in bulky fonts, nicely show both how isolating anxiety can feel and how physical it can be. Telgemeier's particular talent for rendering evocative facial expressions with only a few carefully placed marks makes the pain, worry, and panic in Raina's face and body language unmistakable. As in Smile (2009) and Sisters (2014), Telgemeier gets to the heart of middle-school experiences, from the playground jokes to the minefield of shifting friendships, and the many, many fans of her work will be enchanted by this as well.HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Telgemeier is a force unto herself in kids graphic novels. Trust me, this will have a lengthy wait list. Grades 3-6. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.





Young Raina is 9 when she throws up for the first time that she remembers, due to a stomach bug. Even a year later, when she is in fifth grade, she fears getting sick. Raina begins having regular stomachaches that keep her home from school. She worries about sharing food with her friends and eating certain kinds of foods, afraid of getting sick or food poisoning. Raina's mother enrolls her in therapy. At first Raina isn't sure about seeing a therapist, but over time she develops healthy coping mechanisms to deal with her stress and anxiety. Her therapist helps her learn to ground herself and relax, and in turn she teaches her classmates for a school project. Amping up the green, wavy lines to evoke Raina's nausea, Telgemeier brilliantly produces extremely accurate visual representations of stress and anxiety. Thought bubbles surround Raina in some panels, crowding her with anxious "what if"s, while in others her negative self-talk appears to be literally crushing her. Even as she copes with anxiety disorder and what is eventually diagnosed as mild irritable bowel syndrome, she experiences the typical stresses of school life, going from chee r to panic in the blink of an eye. Raina is white, and her classmates are diverse; one best friend is Korean American. With young readers diagnosed with anxiety in ever increasing numbers, this book offers a necessary mirror to many. (Graphic memoir. 8-12) Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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