Chief : The Life and Turbulent Times of Chief Justice John Roberts
by Biskupic, Joan







Prologue1(12)
Chapter I From Lancashire To Wonder Street
13(20)
Chapter II The Education Of John Roberts
33(30)
Chapter III Hearing The Call
63(26)
Chapter IV "May It Please The Court"
89(28)
Chapter V The Standout
117(24)
Chapter VI The Right Place
141(30)
Chapter VII Blacks, Whites, And Brown
171(22)
Chapter VIII Politics And Money
193(28)
Chapter IX A Switch In Time
221(28)
Chapter X Divided By Race
249(26)
Chapter XI A Fractured Court
275(28)
Chapter XII An Open Seat
303(22)
Chapter XIII The Roberts Court In The Trump Era
325(20)
Epilogue345(6)
Acknowledgments351(4)
Selected Bibliography355(4)
Notes359(46)
Index405


An incisive biography of the Supreme Court's enigmatic chief justice takes readers inside the momentous legal decisions of his tenure so far. 35,000 first printing.





Joan Biskupic is a legal analyst at CNN. Previously, she served as an editor-in-charge for legal affairs at Reuters and as the Supreme Court correspondent for The Washington Post. A Pulitzer Prize finalist and author of books on Sandra Day O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, and Sonia Sotomayor, Biskupic lives in Washington, DC.





During Roberts' reign as the seventeenth chief justice of the Supreme Court, he has attracted detractors when he ruled favorably in a case involving the Affordable Care Act, going against the wishes of fellow conservative jurists and lawmakers in failing to dismantle President Obama's signature legislation. Equal outrage was sparked among liberal factions when he took the lead in the Citizens United case, which opened corporate coffers to political campaigns. Being in the center of the storm is not a natural setting for Roberts, an introspective, midwestern conservative and devout Catholic who knew from an early age that the law was his calling. As legal analyst and biographer Biskupic continues her look at the Supreme Court, following Breaking In: The Rise of Sonia Sotomayor and the Politics of Justice (2014), she evaluates Roberts' tenure via the court's most disputed cases involving race, voting rights, reproductive rights, and LGBTQ rights. What emerges is a balanced portrait of this most influential of judges. What surprises is the unprecedented glimpse at the interpersonal, and often contentious, relationships that reverberate throughout the court. Copyright 2019 Booklist Reviews.





Digging into the life career of the elusive chief justice.CNN legal analyst Biskupic, who was the Supreme Court correspondent at the Washington Post and has written biographies on Sonia Sotomayor, Antonin Scalia, and Sandra Day O'Connor, is perfectly positioned to dissect the first decade-plus tenure of Chief Justice John Roberts (b. 1955). Appointed by President George W. Bush in 2005 after the sudden death of William Rehnquist, Roberts, at only age 50, was chosen for his conservative bona fides, his Ivy League education, the many cases he had argued before the Supreme Court, and his resistant views on affirmative action and voting rights, among other expressed opinions. Indeed, in his general approach to law, Roberts has proven that he is, as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg declared, "born conservative." Yet he has also made some intriguing decisions—e.g., finding the core of the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare—the provision upholding the individual insurance man date—constitutional in the watershed case National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius (2012). While his 2013 Selby County v. Holder decision "eviscerating a key section of the Voting Rights Act" addressed what he perceived as the "failure of racial remedies in America"—as Biskupic writes, it "marked the first time since the 19th century that the Supreme Court struck down a civil rights law protecting people based on race"—he seems, on the basis of other rulings, concerned that his court is delineated solely along political lines. After Scalia's death in February 2016, the court was left without a successor for more than 400 days thanks to political maneuvering and the Republican blocking of President Barack Obama's nominee, Merrick Garland—a difficult period for the court. As the author demonstrates in her incisive analysis, the 5-4 "conservative-liberal fault line" has prevailed—e.g., in the upholding of Donald Trump's Muslim ban. A thorough, albeit somewhat premature, biographical portrait. Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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