Educated : A Memoir
by Westover, Tara







Author's Notexi
Prologuexiii
PART ONE
1 Choose The Good
3(10)
2 The Midwife
13(11)
3 Cream Shoes
24(7)
4 Apache Women
31(10)
5 Honest Dirt
41(13)
6 Shield And Buckler
54(13)
7 The Lord Will Provide
67(9)
8 Tiny Harlots
76(8)
9 Perfect In His Generations
84(8)
10 Shield Of Feathers
92(6)
11 Instinct
98(6)
12 Fish Eyes
104(8)
13 Silence In The Churches
112(10)
14 My Feet No Longer Touch Earth
122(10)
15 No More A Child
132(10)
16 Disloyal Man, Disobedient Heaven
142(11)
PART TWO
17 To Keep It Holy
153(7)
18 Blood And Feathers
160(7)
19 In The Beginning
167(7)
20 Recitals Of The Fathers
174(8)
21 Skullcap
182(5)
22 What We Whispered And What We Screamed
187(11)
23 I'm From Idaho
198(9)
24 A Knight, Errant
207(9)
25 The Work Of Sulphur
216(7)
26 Waiting For Moving Water
223(5)
27 If I Were A Woman
228(7)
28 Pygmalion
235(9)
29 Graduation
244(11)
PART THREE
30 Hand Of The Almighty
255(10)
31 Tragedy Then Farce
265(9)
32 A Brawling Woman In A Wide House
274(5)
33 Sorcery Of Physics
279(5)
34 The Substance Of Things
284(6)
35 West Of The Sun
290(7)
36 Four Long Arms, Whirling
297(9)
37 Gambling For Redemption
306(8)
38 Family
314(6)
39 Watching The Buffalo
320(7)
40 Educated
327(4)
Acknowledgments331(2)
A Note on the Text333


Traces the author's experiences as a child born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, describing her participation in her family's paranoid stockpiling activities and her resolve to educate herself well enough to earn acceptance into a prestigious university and the unfamiliar world beyond.





Tara Westover was born in Idaho in 1986. She received her BA from Brigham Young University in 2008 and was subsequently awarded a Gates Cambridge Scholarship. She earned an MPhil from Trinity College, Cambridge, in 2009, and in 2010 was a visiting fellow at Harvard University. She returned to Cambridge, where she was awarded a PhD in history in 2014. Educated is her first book.





To the Westovers, public education was the quickest way to put yourself on the wrong path. By the time the author, the youngest Westover, had come along, her devout Mormon parents had pulled all of their seven children out of school, preferring to teach just the essentials: a little bit of reading, a lot of scripture, and the importance of family and a hard day's work. Westover's debut memoir details how her isolated upbringing in the mountains of Idaho led to an unexpected outcome: Cambridge, Harvard, and a PhD. Though Westover's entrance into academia is remarkable, at its heart, her memoir is a family history: not just a tale of overcoming but an uncertain elegy to the life that she ultimately rejected. Westover manages both tenderness and a savage honesty that spares no one, not even herself: nowhere is this more powerful than in her relationship with her brother Shawn, her abuser and closest friend. In its keen exploration of family, history, and the narratives we create for ourselves, Educated becomes more than just a success story. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.





A recent Cambridge University doctorate debuts with a wrenching account of her childhood and youth in a strict Mormon family in a remote region of Idaho.It's difficult to imagine a young woman who, in her teens, hadn't heard of the World Trade Center, the Holocaust, and virtually everything having to do with arts and popular culture. But so it was, as Westover chronicles here in fairly chronological fashion. In some ways, the author's father was a classic anti-government paranoiac—when Y2K failed to bring the end of the world, as he'd predicted, he was briefly humbled. Her mother, though supportive at times, remained true to her beliefs about the subordinate roles of women. One brother was horrendously abusive to the author and a sister, but the parents didn't do much about it. Westover didn't go to public school and never received professional medical care or vaccinations. She worked in a junkyard with her father, whose fortunes rose and fell and rose again when his wi fe struck it rich selling homeopathic remedies. She remained profoundly ignorant about most things, but she liked to read. A brother went to Brigham Young University, and the author eventually did, too. Then, with the encouragement of professors, she ended up at Cambridge and Harvard, where she excelled—though she includes a stark account of her near breakdown while working on her doctoral dissertation. We learn about a third of the way through the book that she kept journals, but she is a bit vague about a few things. How, for example, did her family pay for the professional medical treatment of severe injuries that several of them experienced? And—with some justification—she is quick to praise herself and to quote the praise of others. An astonishing account of deprivation, confusion, survival, and success. Copyright Kirkus 2017 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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