Modern Herstory : Stories of Women and Nonbinary People Rewriting History
by Imani, Blair; Tegan And Sara (FRW); Le, Monique (ILT)







Forewordvi
Tegan
Sara
Introductionviii
1 Laying The Groundwork
1(16)
Sylvia Rivera & Marsha P. Johnson
5(3)
Lorraine Hansberry
8(3)
Patsy Takemoto Mink
11(1)
Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson & Katherine Johnson
12(5)
2 Leading The Movement
17(20)
Kimberle Crenshaw
23(1)
Alicia Garza
24(3)
Patrisse Cullors
27(1)
Opal Tometi
28(3)
Carmen Perez
31(1)
Linda Sarsour
32(3)
Tamika D. Mallory
35(2)
3 Speaking Truth To Power
37(24)
Allison Renville
41(1)
Brittany Packnett
42(3)
Geraldine Roman
45(1)
Jamilah Lemieux
46(3)
Janet Mock
49(1)
Keah Brown
50(3)
Manal al-Sharif
53(1)
Rokhaya Diallo
54(3)
Dr. Roxane Gay
57(1)
Sandy Ho
58(3)
4 The Revolution Will Be Live
61(22)
Ava DuVernay
65(1)
Cameron Esposito
66(3)
Constance Wu
69(1)
Ellen DeGeneres
70(3)
Leslie Jones
73(1)
Missy Elliott
74(3)
Oprah Winfrey
77(1)
Serena Williams
78(3)
Solange Knowles
81(2)
5 Mastering Modern Media
83(26)
Aditi Juneja
87(1)
Amandla Stenberg
88(3)
Feminista Jones
91(1)
Franchesca Ramsey
92(3)
Issa Rae
95(1)
Jackie Aina
96(3)
Kat Blaque
99(1)
Michelle Phan
100(3)
Mona Haydar
103(1)
Taye Hansberry
104(3)
Vilissa Thompson
107(2)
6 The Revolution Will Be Ours
109(22)
Dr. Adrienne Keene
113(1)
Alencia Johnson
114(3)
Anjali Paray
117(1)
Jennicet Gutierrez
118(3)
Layshia Clarendon
121(1)
Lori Rodriguez
122(3)
Raquel Willis
125(1)
Dr. Su'ad Abdul Khabeer
126(3)
Winnie Harlow
129(2)
7 The Revolution Will Be Funded
131(22)
Amani Al-Khatahtbeh
135(1)
Alissa Lentz
136(3)
Eman Idil Bare
139(1)
Ibtihaj Muhammad
140(3)
Leslie Mac & Marissa Jenae Johnson
143(4)
Rihanna
147(1)
Shannon Coulter
148(3)
Tegan & Sara
151(2)
8 The Revolution Is Now
153(14)
Jazz Jennings
157(1)
Mari Copeny
158(3)
Marley Dias
161(1)
Taylor Richardson
162(3)
Yara Shahidi
165(1)
Conclusion
166(1)
Glossary Terms, Events, and Phrases167(6)
People173(7)
Organizations180(5)
Hashtags185(2)
About the Author187(1)
About the Illustrator188(2)
Acknowledgments190(2)
Index192


"An illustrated and informative primer on the progressive social change movements of the last 60 years as told through the stories of 60 diverse female and non-binary leaders in those movements, from the Civil Rights Movement and Stonewall riots through today"-





BLAIR IMANI is a black queer American Muslim activist. She is the founder and executive director of Equality for HER, a nonprofit educational platform for feminine-identifying individuals. As a political journalist and commentator, she has appeared on Fox News and MSNBC, and has guest lectured at Yale and Harvard Universities. She has written for the Huffington Post and VICE and has been featured in Nylon, Teen Vogue, Salon, Broadly, VICE, This American Life, The 405, Public Radio International, and Bustle.





*Starred Review* In this accessible, awe-inspiring collection of biographies, black queer American Muslim activist Imani creates a new textbook of history's heroes, free of erasure and white-male bias. The 70 women and nonbinary people featured in this book revolutionized their field of expertise-be it science, literature, entertainment, politics, or activism. Each conversational profile packs a punch of information, leaving readers with a solid introduction to each individual. As the title suggests, these are modern folks, the oldest among them including playwright Lorraine Hansberry; Title IX pioneer Patsy T. Mink; and NASA heroes Katherine Johnson, Mary Jackson, and Dorothy Vaughan. Other highlighted powerhouses include the founders of the Black Lives Matter movement; Women's March organizers; writers such as Roxane Gay and Janet Mock; and entertainer-philanthropists like Oprah Winfrey, Ellen DeGeneres, and Rihanna. There's also a section dedicated to people who made their way on the internet, highlighting the success of Issa Rae, Feminista Jones, and others. The final section of the book looks to the future, honoring revolutionaries born in or after the year 2000. Imani's collection is galvanizing and hopeful, leaving the radicals of tomorrow with proof that all people-no matter their race, gender identity, sexual orientation, or abilities-can change the world. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.





A collection that chronicles the stories of 70 diverse women, girls, and nonbinary people from the 20th and 21st centuries from many traditionally underrepresented groups. A compilation of single-page biographical sketches accompanied by striking full-color portraits, this book focuses on individuals who have all played or are currently playing a part in rewriting history and revolutionizing the way we view and navigate the world. Some, such as Oprah Winfrey, Ellen DeGeneres, and Jazz Jennings, will be well-known to young readers. Others, such as Patsy Takemoto Mink, a Japanese-American woman who broke racial and gender barriers when she was elected to Congress in 1964, are historically significant advocates for equity and inclusion who are frequently overlooked in traditional texts. This book is an important introduction to social justice work, specifically that which pertains to racial, sexual, religious, and ableist discrimination and oppression. It provides a quick and a ccessible reference source for anyone interested in how change can be effected from various levels, from the academic front to grass-roots movements. It will show readers that activists are not monolithic and that they themselves are never too young, small, or different to work toward change. A crucial message of inclusivity and sensitivity is present throughout. This engaging work is about movers and shakers—folks who made moves and shook up the status quo for the betterment of all. (glossary, biographies, organizations, hashtags, index) (Nonfiction. 12-18) Copyright Kirkus 2018 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





INTRODUCTION

When I was twelve years old, I realized that making a difference can be as simple as fighting for what you believe in, unapologetically living in your truth, or taking steps to improve the lives of others. I was fortunate to grow up with the constant encouragement from family and community members that I could realize the change I wanted to see in the world. Every one of us has the potential to make an indelible mark on our world; however, the stories of the ordinary heroes responsible for the most important social changes in history are often obscured. Studying history in college, I learned that it is usually written by those who have the most privilege and the most power. As a result, the contributions of diverse groups are often overlooked or erased, while those in power who uphold the status quo are praised as heroes. 

Throughout history, diverse trailblazing individuals have been subjected to this erasure. For example, voting rights activist and civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer frequently goes unacknowledged in conversations about the Civil Rights Movement. Fannie Lou was a black woman born and raised in rural Mississippi, and she survived the violent oppressions faced by countless black women in the American South. After being fired from her job as a sharecropper simply because she registered to vote, she went on to dedicate her entire life to fighting for the rights of black people to direct their own futures. Fannie Lou was arrested and beaten for attempting to exercise rights, like voting, that America claims to promise to all its people. Similarly, few people are aware of the legacy of Chinese American experimental physicist Chien-Shiung Wu, a key contributor to the World War II–era American research initiative known as the Manhattan Project. The Nobel Prize for her award-winning and eponymous Wu Experiment was given to her male colleagues Tsung-Dao Lee and Chen-Ning Yang in 1957, despite the fact she developed it. Two transgender activists of color, Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson, helped define the present state of LGBTQ rights organizing in the United States; however, their contributions continue to go unacknowledged within the LGBTQ community. Even a film documenting the historic event at which Sylvia and Marsha gained prominence, the 1969 Stonewall Riots, erased the presence of transgender women of color, instead centering the stories of white gay cisgender men.

While “history” focuses on men and the stories of patriarchs, “herstory” deliberately prioritizes the stories of women, people of color, and LGBTQ people. 

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