Bluebird
by Staake, Bob






An exploration of the universal themes of loneliness, bullying, and friendship traces the poignant journey of a bluebird who makes the acquaintance of a young boy and ultimately risks his life to save the boy from harm.





BOB STAAKE has authored and/or illustrated over 50 books, including The Donut Chef, Hello Robots, Look a Book, This Is Not a Pumpkin, and Pets Go Pop. The New York Times named Staake's The Red Lemon one of the 10 best illustrated books of 2006.





*Starred Review* With only a few hues of blue, a rainbow of steely grays, and a set of geometric shapes, Staake's wordless picture book explores friendship, wildlife, sacrifice, death, and hope. A young boy's drab world of loneliness gets a splash of color when he meets a perky bluebird. They share a cookie, get ignored by a pickup soccer game, and play in a pond before wandering into an ominous woods. There a squad of bullies turns the day into a tragedy, with the bird lying lifeless on the ground. An uplifting bit of magic closes the story, and the boy is comforted as the bird is reunited with the clouds and sky. In a mix of full-page artwork and small scenes arranged in sequential panels, Staake works out an impressive range of emotion, from the serene whimsy of cloud gazing to the cruel pointlessness of death, in his distinctive circle-and-square-based artwork. Without use of a single word (outside of a few pieces of signage to place the story in a New York-style city), this book raises all kinds of simple profundities for kids to question, ponder, imagine, and discuss. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.





One little boy, one little bird and one big city come together in a wordless fable of friendship, school, loss and comfort. Readers see the bluebird first, following the boy as he walks to school. Like a guardian angel, the bird watches the boy, even while his classmates mock him. Soon, the bird and boy become friends, returning home from school together, playing hide-and-seek, stopping at a bodega and sailing a boat in a pond. A run-in with a group of thugs leads to the bird's demise. Blues and grays are the colors of this urban world, allowing Staake's design to tell the story. Horizontal and vertical panels are interspersed with full-page spreads, encouraging the reader to slow down and experience the story. Though the volume is wordless, there is some environmental text on the signs of the city, which points to how the boy might feel about his life. Each sign is nearly generic: Gotham Café, Circus, The Steadfast Independent Books. Color changes, from blue to near black to white to blue again, allow readers to feel every emotion, including the devastating climax and the begs-to-be-discussed ending, which is punctuated by eight birds of many colors escorting the boy and the bluebird into the clouds. Like nothing you have seen before. (Picture book. 6 & up) Copyright Kirkus 2013 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.






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