Two Sisters : A Father, His Daughters, and Their Journey into the Syrian Jihad
by Seierstad, A°sne; Kinsella, Seán (TRN)







Author's Notevii
PART I
1 The Rupture
3(18)
2 Veiled
21(18)
3 Blindman's Buff
39(7)
4 In
46(25)
PART II
5 Early Teens
71(8)
6 The Mission
79(8)
7 Eating with the Devil
87(5)
8 Norway, Thine Is Our Devotion
92(10)
9 This Outfit
102(5)
10 It's All About the Heart
107(11)
11 Valentine's Ummah
118(10)
12 Target Practice
128(13)
13 Halal Dating
141(5)
14 Paragraphs
146(10)
15 Strange Bird
156(7)
16 Separation
163(4)
17 Fraud in the Name of God
167(16)
18 The October Revolution
183(8)
PART III
19 Danse Macabre
191(31)
20 Blueprint
222(14)
21 Home
236(8)
22 A Kind, Wonderful Man
244(4)
23 Spoils of War
248(17)
24 The End of Sykes-Picot
265(12)
25 God Is Not Great
277(20)
PART IV
26 Not Without My Daughters
297(9)
27 New Year, New Opportunities
306(7)
28 Housewives of Raqqa
313(11)
29 Boys from Norway
324(14)
30 Shoot the Girls If You Want!
338(19)
31 Ramadan
357(10)
PART V
32 A Different Life
367(10)
33 Voices in the Mind
377(10)
34 Legacy
387(14)
The Basis of the Book401(12)
Glossary413(4)
References417


Describes the true story of how two Somali immigrants living in Norway discovered that their teenage twin daughters have been radicalized and have run away to Syria to join the Islamic State and recounts their harrowing attempt to find them.





Ňsne Seierstad is an award-winning Norwegian journalist and writer known for her work as a war correspondent. She is the author of One of Us: The Story of a Massacre in Norway-and Its Aftermath, The Bookseller of Kabul, One Hundred and One Days: A Baghdad Journal, Angel of Grozny: Orphans of a Forgotten War, and With Their Backs to the World: Portraits of Serbia. She lives in Oslo, Norway.

SeŠn Kinsella was born in Ireland and holds an MPhil in literary translation from Trinity College, Dublin. He lives in Norway with his family.





In which the sins of the children are visited upon the fathers: an unblinking journalistic account of the life of the jihadi."You did not suddenly wake up one day a fanatic," writes Norwegian journalist Seierstad (One of Us: The Story of Anders Breivik and the Massacre in Norway, 2015, etc.) toward the end of this insightful but somewhat overlong story of immigrant dreams betrayed. "It was a direction you grew in." Sadiq had come to Norway with his wife from Somalia and there, by hard work and no small travail, had raised two daughters and a son. In late adolescence, having slipped into a gradual fundamentalist outlook, the two daughters vanished only to announce, both defiantly and apologetically, that they were off to battle the infidels on the battlefields of Syria. Their journey led them into a hornet's nest of Islamic State terrorists from every corner of the Muslim world arrayed against a Russian-backed dictatorship; there they plunged ever further into the violent jiha di cause. As the daughters, never quite silent or out of sight, became more religious, the son became more militant in rejecting Islam; part of the value of Seierstad's informative account is to witness the back-and-forth emails among them: "God…is such a self-obsessed asshole that he wants the people he ‘created' to pray to him five times a day and for those who don't believe in him to be killed," writes the son, to which the daughter replies, "instead of talking crap and being offensive try finding the truth or shut up and respect other people's choices." Meanwhile, even as his family was falling apart, Sadiq tried to remove his daughters from Syria—no easy matter when they didn't want to leave, standing by their choice to submit to IS. "Is it ethically defensible to focus on the lives of two girls when they have not granted their consent?" Seierstad wonders at the end. That is for readers to decide, now knowing much more about what drives people to fanat i cal causes. Copyright Kirkus 2018 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2018 Follett School Solutions