Diamond Eye
by Quinn, Kate






Known as Lady Death-a lethal hunter of Nazis-Mila Pavlichenko, sent to America on a goodwill tour, forms an unexpected friendship with First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and a connection with a silent fellow sniper, offering her a chance at happiness until her past returns with a vengeance. 200,000 first printing.





*Starred Review* Quinn (The Rose Code, 2021) incorporates the life of Lyudmila Pavlichenko, history's most successful female sniper, into this thrilling novel. In 1941, after the Nazis invade her Soviet homeland, Mila, a library researcher and single mother with an arrogant, estranged husband, leaves her family and university studies to join the Red Army, intent on utilizing her marksmanship training. The on-the-ground action is propulsive as Mila forms bonds with other soldiers while battling sexism and waiting patiently in trenches for her targets to appear. Quinn alternates these immersively realistic scenes with a narrative set in 1942, as danger stalks Mila and President Roosevelt during her overseas goodwill tour to persuade America to open a second front in Europe. From the killer opening line to the suspenseful denouement, Quinn's novel is a winner. Set aside any preconceptions about a sniper's typical personality. Mila is a brave, witty woman of steely resolve-"don't miss" is her modus operandi-who falls passionately in love, totes her history dissertation around on missions, and collects leaf samples to mail home to her son. Her unusual friendship with Eleanor Roosevelt is another highlight. Novels about WWII heroines are having a moment, and this is a stellar example. Recommend it to fans of Ariel Lawhon's Code Name Hélène (2020) and all lovers of smart historical fiction.HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Best-selling Quinn herself is a sure draw, but her inspiration for the hero of this powerful WWII tale, a librarian-turned-military-sniper, will appeal to an even greater audience. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.





*Starred Review* Quinn (The Rose Code, 2021) incorporates the life of Lyudmila Pavlichenko, history's most successful female sniper, into this thrilling novel. In 1941, after the Nazis invade her Soviet homeland, Mila, a library researcher and single mother with an arrogant, estranged husband, leaves her family and university studies to join the Red Army, intent on utilizing her marksmanship training. The on-the-ground action is propulsive as Mila forms bonds with other soldiers while battling sexism and waiting patiently in trenches for her targets to appear. Quinn alternates these immersively realistic scenes with a narrative set in 1942, as danger stalks Mila and President Roosevelt during her overseas goodwill tour to persuade America to open a second front in Europe. From the killer opening line to the suspenseful denouement, Quinn's novel is a winner. Set aside any preconceptions about a sniper's typical personality. Mila is a brave, witty woman of steely resolve-"don't miss" is her modus operandi-who falls passionately in love, totes her history dissertation around on missions, and collects leaf samples to mail home to her son. Her unusual friendship with Eleanor Roosevelt is another highlight. Novels about WWII heroines are having a moment, and this is a stellar example. Recommend it to fans of Ariel Lawhon's Code Name Hélène (2020) and all lovers of smart historical fiction.HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Best-selling Quinn herself is a sure draw, but her inspiration for the hero of this powerful WWII tale, a librarian-turned-military-sniper, will appeal to an even greater audience. Copyright 2022 Booklist Reviews.






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