Efren Divided
by Cisneros, Ernesto






While his father works two jobs, seventh-grader Efrén Nava must take care of his twin siblings, kindergartners Max and Mia, after their mother is deported to Mexico. Includes glossary of Spanish words.





*Starred Review* Efrén Nava has a tight-knit family-Max and Mia, his younger twin siblings; his hard-working father, Apá; and his mom, Queen of the Best Sopes, Amá (otherwise known as Soperwoman in Efrén's mind), who is the glue that keeps the family together. Efrén is happy with the way his life is going-he's working hard at school, spending time with his best friend David, and visiting his school library. But one day, Efrén's world comes crashing down when his beloved Amá gets deported. Now he must do his part in supporting his family, which means helping take care of his siblings, managing money, and being strong for his father, all while keeping up at school and helping David become class president. How long, he wonders, can the family go on without Amá? With matter-of-fact storytelling from Efrén's point of view, Cisneros' debut offers a vivid glimpse into the difficult, tenuous lives of immigrant families, succinctly communicates the heartbreaking impact of deportations, and demonstrates the resiliency of those affected, all grounded in the perspective of a relatable protagonist. This timely middle-grade novel will not only open dialogue with children on the issue of immigration but also encourage conversations on the subjects of kindness, empathy, and activism. A moving novel perfectly pitched to its audience. Grades 3-6. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





*Starred Review* Efrén Nava has a tight-knit family-Max and Mia, his younger twin siblings; his hard-working father, Apá; and his mom, Queen of the Best Sopes, Amá (otherwise known as Soperwoman in Efrén's mind), who is the glue that keeps the family together. Efrén is happy with the way his life is going-he's working hard at school, spending time with his best friend David, and visiting his school library. But one day, Efrén's world comes crashing down when his beloved Amá gets deported. Now he must do his part in supporting his family, which means helping take care of his siblings, managing money, and being strong for his father, all while keeping up at school and helping David become class president. How long, he wonders, can the family go on without Amá? With matter-of-fact storytelling from Efrén's point of view, Cisneros' debut offers a vivid glimpse into the difficult, tenuous lives of immigrant families, succinctly communicates the heartbreaking impact of deportations, and demonstrates the resiliency of those affected, all grounded in the perspective of a relatable protagonist. This timely middle-grade novel will not only open dialogue with children on the issue of immigration but also encourage conversations on the subjects of kindness, empathy, and activism. A moving novel perfectly pitched to its audience. Grades 3-6. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





A young boy must become an adult overnight when his mother is deported. Twelve-year-old Efrén Nava's world is turned upside down the day he comes back from school and his mother is nowhere to be found. His neighbor Doña Chana tells him that an ICE raid was conducted at the supermarket and that Amá was picked up and deported to Mexico. When his father takes on a second job to make ends meet, Efrén becomes the primary caregiver for Mía and Max, his younger twin siblings. Unsure of how much information about his mother's fate to give them, Efrén tries his best to make Amá's miracles his own as he struggles to keep his siblings safe, feed them, and take them to school while still dealing with his own schooling. Taking care of Max, whose oxygen supply was cut off during childbirth and has learning disabilities, and figuring out which friends and adults to trust with his secret add layers of responsibility Efrén feels unprepared to deal with. Debut author Cisneros paints a vivid and palpable #ownvoices picture of the lost childhoods as children and parents are separated due to immigration issues. But even as Efrén's world seems to be crashing around him, Cisneros celebrates the kindness of the Mexican American community and its richness of food, culture, and resilient spirit. Honest and tender: a must-read. (Fiction. 8-13) Copyright Kirkus 2019 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






Terms of Use   ©Copyright 2020 Follett School Solutions