Dark Towers : Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction
by Enrich, David







Authors Notexi
Prologue1(12)
PART I
Chapter 1 A Criminal Enterprise
13(14)
Chapter 2 Edson And Bill
27(15)
Chapter 3 Wall Street's Great Migration
42(9)
Chapter 4 Forces Of Darkness
51(12)
Chapter 5 Projectosprey
63(5)
Chapter 6 Trump's Bankers
68(13)
Chapter 7 Riptide
81(6)
Chapter 8 The Last Day
87(10)
Chapter 9 Ackermann
97(15)
Chapter 10 The Mar-A-Lago Prize
112(10)
Chapter 11 Der Ihder
122(11)
Chapter 12 Fireman
133(10)
Chapter 13 "This Guy Is A Danger"
143(3)
Chapter 14 The Pendulum Swings
146(11)
Chapter 15 Clueless Old Man
157(9)
Chapter 16 Rosemary Vrablic
166(12)
Chapter 17 Anshu Ascendant
178(8)
Chapter 18 Dumping Ground
186(5)
Chapter 19 5,777 Requests For Information
191(12)
Chapter 20 Stress
203(10)
PART II
Chapter 21 Valentin
213(8)
Chapter 22 Life Extinct
221(2)
Chapter 23 Everything Is Upside Down
223(8)
Chapter 24 No Reason For Concern
231(10)
Chapter 25 Poor Brilliant Bill
241(10)
Chapter 26 The North Koreans
251(7)
Chapter 27 No Confidence
258(11)
Chapter 28 Trump Endeavor 12 Llc
269(10)
Chapter 29 The Damage I Have Done
279(8)
Chapter 30 Person Of Interest
287(11)
Chapter 31 Siena
298(7)
Chapter 32 Rosemary Is The Boss
305(9)
Chapter 33 Do Not Utter The Word "Trump"
314(9)
Chapter 34 Spycraft
323(11)
Chapter 35 A Note From The President
334(17)
Epilogue351(12)
Acknowledgments363(4)
Endnotes367(24)
Index391


"A searing expos‚e by an award-winning journalist of the most scandalous bank in the world, including its shadowy ties to Donald Trump's business empire"-





Throughout the seesawing legal negotiations surrounding the release of Donald Trump's elusive tax returns, one bank, and one bank only, has emerged as the critical player whose cooperation is the keystone to unmasking the president's financial past. For 150 years, the German institution Deutsche Bank has engaged in taking bold, quasi-legal, and perhaps overtly felonious risks under the leadership of an ever-changing retinue of cutthroat CEOs who have collectively let their ambition cloud their fiduciary judgment. Allegations of laundering money for Russian oligarchs, manipulating currency markets, violating sanctions, ignoring regulations, and deceiving customers have subjected them to U.S. and international scrutiny. But it will undoubtedly be its highly irregular relationship with its most notorious client, Donald Trump, that may ultimately be its undoing, if details of gargantuan loans and the president's cavalier handling of those loans are exposed under congressional investigation. New York Times finance editor Enrich's immersion in this shadowy world of monetary malfeasance shows how the disreputable world of big-stakes banking could topple an equally unscrupulous president. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





Throughout the seesawing legal negotiations surrounding the release of Donald Trump's elusive tax returns, one bank, and one bank only, has emerged as the critical player whose cooperation is the keystone to unmasking the president's financial past. For 150 years, the German institution Deutsche Bank has engaged in taking bold, quasi-legal, and perhaps overtly felonious risks under the leadership of an ever-changing retinue of cutthroat CEOs who have collectively let their ambition cloud their fiduciary judgment. Allegations of laundering money for Russian oligarchs, manipulating currency markets, violating sanctions, ignoring regulations, and deceiving customers have subjected them to U.S. and international scrutiny. But it will undoubtedly be its highly irregular relationship with its most notorious client, Donald Trump, that may ultimately be its undoing, if details of gargantuan loans and the president's cavalier handling of those loans are exposed under congressional investigation. New York Times finance editor Enrich's immersion in this shadowy world of monetary malfeasance shows how the disreputable world of big-stakes banking could topple an equally unscrupulous president. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.





A deep-reaching look at the inner workings of Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump's lender of choice. At the heart of this aptly titled book is the suicide of a Deutsche executive in 2014 and the subsequent quest of his son to find out the reasons for it. That story, well rendered by New York Times finance editor Enrich (The Spider Network: How a Math Genius and Gang of Scheming Bankers Pulled Off One of the Greatest Scams in History, 2017), takes many twists and turns, but its outlines are familiar: A corporation with a dodgy history (including financing the construction of Nazi death camps) goes straight for a time, guided by people of conscience who are eventually overwhelmed by executives willing to let ethics slide in the quest for profit. The latter category includes a banker who sat onstage at Trump's inauguration—and without whose legally problematic help, Enrich suggests, Trump would never have attained office. While many financial institutions refused to lend to Trump because of his habit of reneging, Deutsche was "the only mainstream bank consistently willing to do business" with him—and at the time of the presidential election, he owed the bank $350 million. But did he really, or was the bank merely a front for funding from other sources headquartered in Moscow? The author works his way through a spaghetti tangle of leads with all sorts of unsavory connections, including the family of Trump's son-in-law, members of whom "were moving money to the Russians at the same time that Russia was interfering in the American presidential election." The implications are more than suggestive. What is inarguable, by Enrich's account, is that Deutsche suffered through a clash of corporate cultures by which one side strived to comply with such things as financial stress tests while worrying that a newly elected Trump would default, leaving it "the ugly choice between seizing the president's personal assets or not enforcing the loan terms," even as the other continued corrupt practices for nearly two decades. Following the money becomes easier in this thoroughly researched, if dispiriting, work of investigative journalism. Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.





A deep-reaching look at the inner workings of Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump's lender of choice. At the heart of this aptly titled book is the suicide of a Deutsche executive in 2014 and the subsequent quest of his son to find out the reasons for it. That story, well rendered by New York Times finance editor Enrich (The Spider Network: How a Math Genius and Gang of Scheming Bankers Pulled Off One of the Greatest Scams in History, 2017), takes many twists and turns, but its outlines are familiar: A corporation with a dodgy history (including financing the construction of Nazi death camps) goes straight for a time, guided by people of conscience who are eventually overwhelmed by executives willing to let ethics slide in the quest for profit. The latter category includes a banker who sat onstage at Trump's inauguration—and without whose legally problematic help, Enrich suggests, Trump would never have attained office. While many financial institutions refused to lend to Trump because of his habit of reneging, Deutsche was "the only mainstream bank consistently willing to do business" with him—and at the time of the presidential election, he owed the bank $350 million. But did he really, or was the bank merely a front for funding from other sources headquartered in Moscow? The author works his way through a spaghetti tangle of leads with all sorts of unsavory connections, including the family of Trump's son-in-law, members of whom "were moving money to the Russians at the same time that Russia was interfering in the American presidential election." The implications are more than suggestive. What is inarguable, by Enrich's account, is that Deutsche suffered through a clash of corporate cultures by which one side strived to comply with such things as financial stress tests while worrying that a newly elected Trump would default, leaving it "the ugly choice between seizing the president's personal assets or not enforcing the loan terms," even as the other continued corrupt practices for nearly two decades. Following the money becomes easier in this thoroughly researched, if dispiriting, work of investigative journalism. Copyright Kirkus 2020 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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