Read & Riot : A Pussy Riot Guide to Activism
by Tolokonnikova, Nadya







Introduction1(12)
Preliminary Statement
1(3)
We Are Superpowers
4(6)
Words, Deeds, Heroes
10(3)
Rule No 1 Be A Pirate
13(11)
Words pirate people's republic
14(1)
The international waters of piracy
14(3)
Deeds no borders
17(2)
Heroes diogenes
19(5)
Rule No 2 Do it yourself
Words the diy ethos
24(1)
Junk politics
25(4)
Lady simplicity: poor art
29(2)
Deeds kill the sexist
31(5)
Creating a political feminist punk band: the basics
36(1)
Heroes d. a. prigov
36(5)
Rule No 3 Take back the joy
41(18)
Words we shall live in love and laughter
42(1)
Dada
43(4)
Deeds if the kids are united
47(3)
Heroes 1968
50(9)
Rule No 4 Make Your Government Shit Its Pants
59(16)
Words question the status quo
60(2)
Deeds don't talk baby talk
62(4)
Art in action
66(2)
Sexists are fucked
68(3)
Heroes Dr. martin luther king jr.
71(4)
Rule No 5 Commit An Art crime
75(20)
Words the human as a political and artistic animal
77(4)
Destroy the (fourth) wall
81(2)
A prayer
83(1)
Deeds pussy riot church
84(6)
Heroes the yes men
90(5)
Rule No 6 Spot An Abuse Of Power
95(28)
Words lie, cheat, steal (everybody's doin' it); or, who is mr. putin and what does it have to do with mr. trump?
95(6)
Alt-right fascists
101(13)
Deeds bite off your tongue no take back the streets
114(5)
Heroes the berrigan brothers
119(4)
Rule No 7 Don't Give Up Easy, Resist Organize
123(18)
Words take your beatings as a badge of honor
124(5)
Deeds freedom is the crime that contains all crimes
129(7)
Heroes emmeline pankhurst
136(5)
Rule No 8 Break Out From Prison
141(44)
Words the prison-industrial complex
142(10)
Deeds prison riot
152(19)
Heroes michel foucault
171(3)
Liberation theology-: a conversation with chris hedges
174(11)
Rule No 9 Create Alternates
185(24)
Words stay weird
186(6)
All power to the imagination
192(2)
Deeds alternative: another law enforcement system is possible
194(4)
Alternative: a different media is possible
198(6)
Heroes aleksandra kollontai
204(5)
Rule No 10 Be a (woman
209(30)
Words proud witch and bitch
209(10)
The monster of obligatory perfection
219(5)
Deeds revolution is my girlfriend
224(4)
Heroes bell hooks
228(3)
The closing statement: hope comes from the hopeless
231(10)
Afterword239(4)
Kim Gordon
Afterword
241(2)
Olivia Wilde
A pussy riot reading list243


The artist and punk musician discusses the importance of identifying abuses of power and outlines steps that can be taken to protest against the injustices of the status quo, with anecdotes from her life as a radical protester in Russia and the eighteen months she spent in prison there.





Tolokonnikova made global headlines when she was arrested in 2012 for singing an anti-Putin song with her punk band, Pussy Riot, in a Russian church. After spending 18 months in prison, Tolokonnikova reentered society emboldened by her torment and scrappier than ever. Her new book is an ultimate how-to guide for budding activists looking to boost their radical prowess. Amid her wise tips for everyday gauntlet-picking-up, Tolokonnikova shares keen observations about the similarities between modern world leaders from Putin to Trump to Marion Le Pen. Her instructions for changing the world are simple but will wield enormous influence. She encourages readers to vote with their wallets by shopping at establishments with positive economic and environmental practices. She dares her audience to challenge abuses of power by any authority figure, not just those in the public eye. Most importantly, she reminds readers to infuse joy into everything they do. As Tolokonnikova points out, nothing crumbles tyranny quite like genuine laughter. Whip-smart, playful, and unapologetic, Tolokonnikova's book is an inimitable guide to civil disobedience. Copyright 2018 Booklist Reviews.





A raucous fusion of memoir and action guide by a founding member of Vladimir Putin's least favorite band, Pussy Riot.In her debut, Tolokonnikova writes with an uncompromising mixture of fervor and humor, reflecting on her own hardscrabble life and the artistic development of her beloved band of provocateurs, who gained notoriety for critiques of post-communist Russia's descent into an authoritarian oligarchy, culminating in the band's 2012 prison sentence. As musician Kim Gordon says in her afterword, the book "is serious but has the playful feel of a Mission Impossible show." Still, Tolokonnikova establishes high stakes, noting that "prison terms for political activists are seen as normal in public consciousness. When nightmares happen every day, people stop reacting to them." The book has a sprawling yet regimented structure. While each chapter focuses on a precept for direct action as related to the Pussy Riot ethos—e.g., "Take Back the Joy" and "Make Your Government Shit Its Pants"—each also contains the author's reflections on her formative experiences and readings of other thinkers and activists from whom she drew strength, especially during her unpleasant experiences as a prisoner following an unauthorized concert in the Russian Orthodox Church's Cathedral of Christ the Savior. She notes that their "punk prayer" and subsequent prosecution "exposed the brutal and cruel side of the government, but we didn't do anything illegal. It's not illegal to sing and say what you think." Her stay in prison only amplified her rebellious determination, since she felt it linked her to mass incarceration and other political prisoners worldwide. In each chapter, the author urges readers to take concrete steps toward their own resistance. Though the writing can be abstruse—"we're more than atoms, separated and frightened by TV and mutual distrust"—the book follows its own inner logic, code-switching between political idealism and gri t ty, sensory experience, seeding appeal for millennial readers. A chaotic, irreverent testimonial ideal for frustrated progressives in this turbulent political moment. Copyright Kirkus 2018 Kirkus/BPI Communications. All rights reserved.






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